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Introduction > About → These → Arrows

About → These → Arrows

Throughout this book, you'll find sentences like this one: "Open the System → Libraries → Fonts folder." That's shorthand for a much longer instruction that directs you to open three nested folders in sequence, like this: "On your hard drive, you'll find a folder called System. Open that. Inside the System folder window is a folder called Libraries. Double-click it to open it. Inside that folder is yet another one called Fonts. Double-click to open it, too."

Similarly, this kind of arrow shorthand simplifies the business of choosing commands in menus, such as → Dock → Position on Bottom, as shown in Figure P-1. Occasionally, you'll also see arrow notation used to indicate which tab or pane of a dialog box you're supposed to click: "Open the System Preferences → Sound panel," for example.

Figure P-1. In this book, arrow notation helps to simplify folder and menu instructions. For example, "Choose → Dock → Position on Bottom" is a more compact way of saying, "From the menu, choose Dock. From the submenu that appears next, choose Position on Bottom," as shown here.


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