• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 4. Task and Setting Index > Accounts and User Management

Accounts and User Management


Add another user to the system?

System Preferences → Accounts → New User (requires administrator privileges)

Unix administrators might be tempted to use the useradd, userdel, and usermod commands to add, remove, and modify a user, respectively, from the Terminal. However, this isn't possible, since those commands don't exist on Mac OS X.


Remove a user from the system?

System Preferences → Accounts → username → Delete User

While logged in, you can't remove yourself from the system. If you want to remove your user account from the system, you will have to log out and log back in as another user.


Configuring my login?

System Preferences → Accounts → Login Options


Change my login password?

System Preferences → My Account My Password → Change

System Preferences → Accounts → Users → username → Edit User

Use the passwd command in the Terminal.

When choosing a password, you should avoid using dictionary words (i.e., common, everyday words found in the dictionary) or something that could be easily guessed. To improve your security, we recommend that you choose an alphanumeric password. Remember, passwords are case-sensitive, so you can mix upper- and lowercase letters with your password as well.


Give a user administrator privileges?

System Preferences → Accounts → Users → username → Edit User → Allow user to administer this computer (requires administrator privileges)


Restrict which applications a user can use?

System Preferences → Accounts → Users → username → Capabilities. Click on the checkbox next to "Use only these applications," and then use the lower-half of the window to pick and choose which applications the user can have access to.

Keep this in mind if you have a user you'd like to restrict from issuing Unix commands. You can cut off their access to using the Terminal application by clicking the disclosure triangle next to Utilities, and then unchecking the box next to the Terminal.


Keep a user from changing his password?

System Preferences → Accounts → Users → username → Capabilities; uncheck the box next to Change password


Turn off automatic login?

System Preferences → Accounts → uncheck the box next to "Log in automatically as username"


On a multiuser system, specify which user will be automatically logged on?

System Preferences → Accounts → Users → username → Set Auto Login... → enter the user's password and click the OK button


Require users to type their username and password when logging in?

System Preferences → Accounts → Login Options → Display Login Window As → select the radio button next to "Name and password"


Allow a user to log into my Mac from a Windows system?

System Preferences → Sharing → Services; check the box next to Windows File Sharing


Set a password hint?

System Preferences → Accounts → username → Edit User; select the text in the Password Hint field, type in a new hint, and click OK to accept the change


Find out which users have admin privileges?

System Preferences → Accounts; users with administrator privileges will have Admin next to their name in the Type column.

Launch NetInfo Manager (/Applications/Utilities). In the Directory Browser pane, select /groupsadmin. In the lower-half of the window, look at the Property value next to users; you will see something like (root, username) in the Value(s) column. (Requires administrator privileges.)


Add a new group?

Launch NetInfo Manager (/Applications/Utilities), and follow these steps:

  1. Click on the padlock icon in the lower-left corner of the window, and enter the administrator's password. This will allow you to make changes.

  2. In the Directory Browser pane, select /groups.

  3. From the menu bar, go to Directory → New Subdirectory (-N). (Requires administrator privileges.)

  4. In the Directory pane below, select the new_directory name by double-clicking on it, and type in a new group name (e.g., editorial) and press Return.

  5. Go to Domain → Save Changes. A message window will appear, asking if you want to save the changes; click on the "Update this copy" button. The name of the new group will appear in the Directory Browser pane.

  6. Click on the padlock to prevent further changes from being made, and quit NetInfo Manager.

As with the user-related Unix commands, Unix users will notice that the various group commands (groupadd, groupdel, groupmod, gpasswd, grpconv, and grpunconv) are missing from Mac OS X. You will need to use NetInfo Manager to manage groups.


Enable the root user account?

Follow these steps to enable the root user account from NetInfo Manager:

  1. Launch NetInfo Manager.

  2. To make changes to the NetInfo settings, click on the padlock in the lower-left corner of the NetInfo window. You will be asked for the administrator's name and password; enter those, and click OK.

  3. In the menu bar, select Security → Enable Root User.

  4. You will be asked to enter a password for the root user. In earlier versions of Mac OS X, the root password had to be eight characters or less; however, in Jaguar, the root password must only be more than five characters in length.

  5. Click OK, and then enter the password again to confirm the password for the root user account. Click on the Verify button to confirm the password and enable the root account.

  6. If you have no further changes to make in NetInfo Manager, click on the padlock at the lower-left of the window to prevent further changes from being made, and quit the application (-Q).

  7. To enable the root user account using the Terminal, enter the following command:

    [macchuck:~] chuck% sudo passwd root
    Password: *******
    Changing password for root.
    New password: ********
    Retype new password: ********
    [macchuck:~] chuck%

The first time you're asked for a password, enter your own. Once you're verified by the system to have administrator privileges, you will be asked to enter and confirm a new password for the root user account.

The asterisks shown in this example won't appear onscreen when you enter the passwords; actually, nothing will happen onscreen. If you make a mistake while entering the password, you can always hit the Backspace or Delete key to go back over what you typed; then just re-enter the password.

Once the root account has been assigned a password, you can use it to log in with the username root.


Restrict a non-admin user to using the Simple Finder?

System Preferences → Accounts → Users → username → Capabilities → select the checkbox next to Use Simple Finder

  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint