• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

1.9. The Recovery Console

Windows 2000 provides a new feature called the Recovery Console that essentially gives you a bootable command console environment for restoring files, modifying the registry, troubleshooting, and other testing and repair operations. The Recovery Console enables you to read NTFS volumes, a major advantage and important reason for installing the console. A bootable DOS or Windows 9x diskette wouldn't give you that capability.

A common use for the Recovery Console is to make system changes that are preventing you from booting the system. For example, you might have installed an application that installed a buggy or incompatible driver, and the driver is preventing the system from booting. You can boot the Recovery Console, disable the driver, then reboot normally to fix the problem. You can also treat the Recovery Console as a sort of quick command console that lets you access your Windows 2000 system without booting the full GUI. On a dual-boot system, for example, you might use the Recovery Console to quickly copy a file from an NTFS volume to a FAT volume for access by Windows 9x. Whatever the need, the Recovery Console gives you a quick way to boot the system without the GUI and perform a variety of tasks, including system troubleshooting and repair.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint