• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

Larger Storage Media

  • CD-ROMs, which look just like audio CDs, store about 690 MB. They're used to distribute software that takes up a lot of room on disk, such as complicated applications, games, and electronic encyclopedias.

  • DVD drives look exactly like CD drives but they hold DVD discs that can store up to 17 GB of data, or a full-length movie.

  • CD-RW drives can both read and write CDs. You can use them to back up and make copies of audio CDs or software programs. You can also use a CD-RW to create your own music CDs.

    CD-RWs drives use two types of discs. A CD-R disc can only be written to once, but CD-RW discs can be modified, or erased and reused. CD-RW sounds better, but they cost more, are a bit more of a hassle to use, and they're not always necessary. Because CD-R discs are so cheap (last time I checked they were less than 50 cents each), you can just keep adding more every time you back up your files. In fact, there is something to be said for having non-erasable discs for backup. Also, a CD-R disc works in just about any type of PC and you don't need any special software to run it. Windows XP has built-in software for recording CD-R discs, though there are other programs (like Roxio's Easy CD Creator) that have more features.

  • Tape cartridges look like giant cassette tapes, and in fact, they work in pretty much the same way. As with audio and VCR tapes, the disadvantage of tape cartridges is that you can't go directly to the track you need; you have to rewind or fast forward to get to the part you want. This makes them too slow to use for the files you work with every day, but they're OK for backups and archives, because they're relatively cheap.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint