• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 1. Macintosh Basics: Hardware an... > Macintosh Models and Computer System...

Macintosh Models and Computer Systems

Over the years, Apple has experimented with a wide variety of Macintosh models and styles. In the mid-'90s, Apple developed a dizzying array of models, with names such as Performas, Quadras, and Duos. However, since Steve Jobs' return to Apple in 1997, its product line has been trimmed into four main categories, each with few if any variations:

  • Consumer desktops are represented by Apple's smash success, the iMac. It is an "all-in-one" unit, which means that the monitor is built into the basic "box" that holds the computer. It's designed to appeal to the typical home user. While it has limited expansion options, it has more than enough juice to get you on the Internet, play today's graphic intensive games, and do basic school, home, and office tasks. The main dilemma is choosing a color for your new iMac.

  • Consumer portables are represented by the sleek new iBook. Its marketing slogan, "an iMac to go" pretty much sums it up: the dimensions are similar to a thin standard portable and it was the first Mac to support the AirPort wireless communication device.

  • Professional desktops are represented by the striking Power Macintosh G3 and G4 units. Monitors are sold for these models separately. These Macs come with numerous expansion options, including bays for additional drives and PCI card slots (see Fix-It #15 for details about slots).

  • Professional portables refer to Apple's esteemed PowerBook series. Variously called laptop or notebook Macs, today's PowerBooks compare favorably in features to Apple's desktop machines.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint