• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

What to Do:

This section is divided into four parts: "Memory Problems When Trying to Open an Application," "Memory Problems When Using an Open Application," "Special Case: Finder-Related Memory Problems," and "How to Increase Overall Memory Availability."

TAKE NOTE — About "About This Computer" and "Get Info"

If you have any problems with memory management, it's useful to assess the allocation of your Macintosh's memory. Some details of how and why to do it were first given in Chapter 2. Here's a summary of the essential steps:

  1. Select About This Computer from the Finder's Apple menu. Check the size of the Largest Unused Block. The Largest Unused Block is a measure of how much memory is still free to be assigned to applications or other uses. It can never be larger than the Total Memory size minus whatever is used by the Mac OS. Any application that needs more memory than this cannot be opened without first increasing the size of the Largest Unused Block (as described in the main text).

  2. Select Get Info (from the Finder's File menu) for the application you wish to open. In the Get Info window, select "Memory" from the Show pop-up menu. The Minimum size is the minimally required amount of RAM needed to open the application. The application will use more than its Minimum, if memory is available, up until it reaches the Preferred size. The Preferred size is the typical maximum that the program will use. The more closely a program opens toward its Minimum rather than its Preferred size, the more likely it is to have memory-related problems (such as an inability to open large documents).

  3. Compare the information in the application's Get Info window and in About This Computer. If the program's Minimum size is larger than the Largest Unused Block, you cannot open the program. This is probably the most common reason for the appearance of memory-related alert messages. Solutions to this are described in the main text of this Fix-It ("Memory Problems When Trying to Open an Application"). Also, note that the filled part of the bars in the About This Computer window will get larger as you open documents for the application or make active use of it. When a bar is nearly completely full, you will also be more likely to have memory-related problems with that application. Finally, note that some programs use special memory allocation schemes that differ from the standard procedures outlined here. For example, Adobe's Photoshop has its own virtual memory allocation method that may not be reflected in the About This Computer display. Some programs also use Temporary Memory, as described later in this Fix-It.

Figure F5-1. Check these windows for helpful information about memory allocation: the About This Computer window (top); an application's (AppleWorks) Get Info window (bottom).


  • SEE "Take Note: More About "About This Computer": Bar Shading," "Take Note: Still More About "About This Computer": Built-In Versus Total Memory," and "Take Note: Temporary Memory," for more on this feature.



PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint