• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

Sharing Files

When you enable one of the file sharing services in Sharing preferences, anyone who knows the user name and password of a local account can log in over the network and access files and folders on your computer. Exactly which files and folders they can access is determined by the file sharing service used and the existing permissions. File permissions visible in the Info window (or Terminal) not only protect your files and folders from unauthorized access by local users, they also restrict access by remote users.

For example, if you've enabled Personal File Sharing in Sharing preferences (explained in the next section), remote Mac clients can talk to your server using Apple Filing Protocol. Using AFP, standard users can mount the home folders of other users, but they have full access only to the files and folders in their own home folders. Administrators can mount their own home folder or the entire volume because they may need to make changes outside their own home folders, such as installing new applications or deleting preferences files. However, that doesn't mean administrators can access all the folders in all users' home folders. The default permissions allow access to only the Public and Sites folders, whether you're authenticated as a standard user or as an administrator.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint