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What You've Learned

This lesson introduced finding and connecting to different network services, including how directory services are used for service discovery, account management, and authentication.

  • Mac OS X includes support for a variety of Internet services, including mail, web, instant messaging, and networked scheduling. Each of these services requires an application that the user must configure in order to locate and access the appropriate server.

  • Support for networked file services is built into the operating system, allowing users to access networked file servers as easily as accessing local hard drives. Mac OS X includes support for several network file system protocols, including AFP, SMB, NFS, WebDAV, and FTP.

  • You use service discovery protocols to find out what network services are available. Key service discovery protocols are Bonjour, SMB, AppleTalk, and SLP. You use Directory Access to configure service discovery protocols.

  • User account information is provided to applications through Open Directory, the implementation of directory services on Mac OS X. Directory services also allow multiple computers, including different servers, to share user account information. Information about networked services can also be provided by directory services.

  • Authentication is the process of identifying a user. Each server can require a different user password, but if you use a directory service or Kerberos, users don't have to use different passwords for each network service.


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