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Review Quiz

1:Describe the difference between authentication and authorization, and give an example of each.
2:What is the difference between user and administrator accounts on both Mac OS X and Mac OS X Server?
3:What is the difference between group accounts on Mac OS X and Mac OS X Server?
4:What tool is used to configure user, group, and share point settings on Mac OS X Server? What tool is used to change user and group permissions on Mac OS X?
5:Where do you set file or folder access ACLs?
6:How many characters are allowed in a user short name?

Answers

A1: Authentication is the process by which the system requires you to provide information before it allows you to access a specific account. An example is entering a name and password while connecting to an Apple file server. Authorization refers to the process by which permissions are used to regulate a user's access to specific resources, such as files and share points, once the user has been successfully authenticated.
A2: User accounts provide basic access to a computer or server, while administrator accounts allow a person to administer the machine. On Mac OS X, the administrator account is typically used for changing settings or adding new software. On Mac OS X Server, the administrator account is typically used for changing settings on the server machine itself, usually through Server Admin or Workgroup Manager.
A3: Group accounts on Mac OS X are assigned by default and are difficult to change. Mac OS X Server adds easy-to-use tools for creating, assigning, and changing group accounts.
A4: Workgroup Manager is used to configure on Mac OS X Server. Get Info is used to change permissions on Mac OS X.
A5: Workgroup Manager
A6: 255 Roman characters


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