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Chapter 7. Using Excel Functions > Understanding Function Syntax

Understanding Function Syntax

Functions consist of several different parts. Like a formula, a function begins with an equal (=) sign. The next part is the function name, which might be abbreviated to indicate what the function does. Examples of a function name might be SUM, AVERAGE, or COUNT. After the name, you enter a set of parentheses and enter arguments within those parentheses. Arguments are additional pieces of information that clarify how you want the function to behave. Arguments can consist of one or more components, ranging from cell addresses such as D13 or a range of cell addresses like D13:D25, to other variables such as a number of digits you want Excel to do something to. With only a few exceptions, all functions in Excel must follow that pattern. This function structure is called the syntax. Here are a few examples of function syntax. You’ll learn throughout this chapter what these functions do.

NOTE

Function names are not case sensitive.


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