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Introduction

Microsoft Office 2003 has the power and flexibility to share information between programs. You can create, store, and manage information in the program that works best for you, and then move that information to another program. Completing a successful project in Office is not always a solitary venture; sometimes you may need to share data with others or obtain data from other programs. In many offices, your co-workers (and their computers) are located across the country or around the world. You can merge information from different programs into a single document, and you can link data between programs. You can create one seamless document that includes data from several programs.

Consider an example. Sarah coordinates her local school district's soccer teams. She sends out monthly newsletters that list the scheduled dates and times for practices and games as well as a brief roundup of scores and highlights from the previous month's games. In Microsoft Access, she creates a database of team members and all their relevant information—names, addresses, phone numbers, emergency numbers, and team positions. She tracks the year-to-date expenses and plans the tentative schedules between teams in Microsoft Excel workbooks. Every month, Sarah writes the newsletter in Microsoft Word, imports the upcoming schedule from Excel, and then merges the newsletter with the Access database to create the mailing. This is just one scenario. As you work with Office programs, you'll find many ways to share information between them.


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