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What Is SharePoint?

If you've been doing any reading about Microsoft's Windows Server 2003, you've probably heard the word SharePoint. You've probably heard it mentioned in several contexts: SharePoint Team Services, SharePoint Portal Server, SharePoint Web Parts, and SharePoint Dashboards. You might be confused about how these items interact and how they can help you. This chapter explains a bit about each of these technologies and goes into detail about how to use the various SharePoint technologies to collaborate with others both inside and outside your organization to share documents. Throughout this chapter, SharePoint Portal Server refers to SharePoint Portal Server 2003, and SharePoint Team Services refers to the SharePoint Team Services that works with Windows Server 2003.

Sharing documents is only one benefit to SharePoint. You can collaborate on meetings by creating shared meeting workspaces that can be accessed via the Internet, the corporate intranet, or even Outlook. For every meeting, you can store the agenda, documents, tasks, and objectives, and manage the attendees for your meeting. A detailed explanation of shared meeting workspaces is beyond the scope of this book, but we'll cover briefly how you can store and access documents to help you better prepare for and follow up on your meetings. Mostly, however, this chapter covers the features of Word 2003 that allow you to work directly with SharePoint technologies. Word users can benefit from SharePoint by utilizing the document collaboration features, implementing document versioning, and using the discussion features to update documents between multiple editors.


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