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Office and the Web

Office 2003 builds on the Web-authoring capabilities of its predecessor, Office XP. With a few exceptions, you can choose to save most types of Office documents in HTML, the language of the Web. When you use HTML format, your Word documents, Excel workbooks, or PowerPoint presentations take on an extra dimension: Anyone with a compatible Web browser can open the saved file and see your document just as you created it (subject to some formatting limitations, which we discuss later in this chapter); anyone who has installed the Office program that was used to create the original document can open the file for editing as well.


This magic works courtesy of XML and style tags embedded within the original document. Every bit of data and formatting is preserved during the “round-trip” from Office program to Web page and back again. You can create and modify documents using Office programs, publish them as Web pages, and know that you'll still be able to make changes to the underlying document.


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