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Chapter 24. Excel Essentials > What's New in Excel 2003

What's New in Excel 2003

If you've mastered the ins and outs of previous Excel versions, you'll be able to get straight to work with Excel 2003. The tasks you're most likely to perform with Excel—building workbooks, working with formulas, analyzing data, and creating charts—are essentially unchanged. Depending on which previous version you're upgrading from, you'll see changes in the Office interface, of course. The differences will be most striking for those making the great leap from Office 97 to Office 2003. In that case, you'll see wholesale improvements throughout Excel. The jump from Excel 2002 (a component of Office XP) is much less jarring.


In fact, the only significant and immediately noticeable change in Excel 2003 is the interface for creating and managing lists. In this version, Excel allows you to define list ranges, which behave differently from more conventional ranges. Using a list range, you can automatically add totals to a list, insert new columns, add a new row of data at the end of a list, import and export lists, and share those lists on an intranet, using SharePoint services and XML. A new List and XML toolbar helps turn many of these tasks into single-click exercises. (For an extensive discussion of these tools, read Chapter 28, “Working with Lists and Databases.”)


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