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Glossary

Glossary

3-D reference

A reference to a range that spans more than one worksheet in a workbook. A reference to the range A1:D4 is not a 3-D reference. A reference to the range Sheet1:Sheet5!A1:D4 is a 3-D reference. Only certain Excel functions can make use of 3-D references: for example, =SUM(Sheet1:Sheet5!A1:D4) is legal, but =MMULT(Sheet1:Sheet5!A1:D4,F1:I4) is not.



Absolute reference

Compare with relative reference and mixed reference. An absolute reference contains a dollar sign ($) before its row component and before its column component. $A$1 is an example of an absolute reference. If you enter =$A$1 in cell C1, and then copy the formula in C1 to cell D1, the formula in both C1 and D1 will be =$A$1. The reference is absolute, and will not change, regardless of where you might copy it.




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