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Chapter 19. Excel Essentials > Working with Worksheets and Workbooks

Working with Worksheets and Workbooks

Excel's basic file format is the workbook, which can hold multiple worksheets. By default, each new Excel workbook starts out with three blank worksheets; an index tab at the bottom of each worksheet identifies the sheet by name. You can add a new worksheet, delete an existing one, and rename or rearrange worksheets to suit your needs.

Multiple worksheets help keep complex projects organized within a single workbook. In a consolidated budget, for example, you might create a separate worksheet for each department's numbers, using identical templates to make sure each budget category appears in the same row and each month is in the same column; then use an identical template to create a summary worksheet that rolls up totals for the entire company. Placing related data tables on different sheets makes it easier to view, format, and print each type of data separately—for example, you might create a loan analysis form on one worksheet, and then generate an amortization table on a separate sheet. When you create new charts or PivotTable (page 614) reports from a list, it's often convenient to give each of these elements its own sheet, so you can rearrange the data in the underlying list without having to worry about whether deleting a row or column will mess up the design of a PivotTable report.


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