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Chapter 1. An Overview of Office 2000 > What's New in Office 2000

What's New in Office 2000

More than 70 million people around the world use one version of Office or another. With a user base that big, it's difficult to imagine that anyone is seeing Word, Excel, and the rest of Office for the first time. If you work for a large corporation or just never found a particularly compelling reason to upgrade, you may have skipped over a version or two to get to Office 2000. If you upgraded from Office 95 or even Office 4, the original 16-bit version of Office that dates back to the early 1990s, you have a lot to absorb, because Microsoft has made wholesale changes to Office over the intervening five or six years.

For the sake of this book, we're going to assume you have at least a nodding familiarity with one version of Office or another. Office 95 users will see a completely new interface, with different toolbar buttons and redesigned dialog boxes that are immediately apparent. If you've just upgraded from Office 97, on the other hand, the differences aren't so obvious—at least not at first boot. The basic Office interface—including toolbars, menus, and the individual applications that make up Office—should look refreshingly familiar to any Office 97 veteran. And with one exception (we'll get to that in a minute, when we cover Access), Office 2000 file formats are identical to their Office 97 counterparts; so you should be able to open, edit, and save all your documents, worksheets, and presentations without any hitches.


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