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Chapter 26. Inserting Text Boxes > Designing Pages with Text Boxes

Designing Pages with Text Boxes

In the past, word processing and desktop publishing programs differed in the way they treated text on the page. Word processors placed text from top to bottom; desktop publishing programs treated text more like graphical blocks that you could move around on the page and embellish with lines, shading, color, and more. With Word, you get both. Regular text still flows from the top of the page to the bottom, but text boxes are free to move anywhere, often with the other text on the page flowing around them. It is text boxes that make Word a workable alternative to a traditional desktop publishing program.

If you're designing publications like newsletters, magazines, or books, consider using text boxes, rather than columns, as the framework for your design. In effect, that's what a desktop publishing program does. The difference is that many desktop publishing programs create the text boxes automatically, while Word does not. For example, you might want to create a three-column newsletter in Word. Each column can be a borderless text box. You can use the rulers to size your text boxes accurately, and you can use Word's text box linking feature, discussed in the next section, "Linking Text Between Text Boxes," to link the text between text boxes. In some cases this may be easier than using Word's column feature, particularly if you want the freedom to easily move, size, and shape your text as you design your pages.


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