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Database Basics

So let’s bring Access into the picture and apply it to the databases I mentioned at the outset of this chapter. Suppose that you want to create a database that tracks information about the new litter of Newfoundland puppies you have.

There is an array of information items to capture about each pup, including birth weight, sex, dam, and sire. As time goes on, you will add weight data to track how quickly the pups are growing. You might add fields categorizing the individual characteristics—this pup has a white star on her chest; that pup is the leader of the group; another pup is the wallflower, and so on. You’ll also record the amount of food the pups are eating, veterinary check-ups and shots, and any comments or additional bits of data you want to keep with each puppy’s data. You’ll enter the individual items you want to record—weight, sex, food, and so on—within fields in the data table. A collection of information about one pup is known as that pup’s record. And the entire collection of data—all the pup records together—comprises the database.


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