• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Part VI: Managing and Tracking the Project > Tracking Work on the Project

Hour 17. Tracking Work on the Project

If you have been applying the lessons in this book to your own project, then you should have a finalized schedule or plan for completing the project on time and within budget—like an architect's plan for a building that meets all the builder's requirements. After work on the project gets underway, you will find that your plan, like the blueprints, will be consulted constantly, and it will be revised as you discover new information about the tasks and the resources you assigned to them. Sometimes actual events even threaten to make the plan unravel, but having your schedule already entered in Microsoft Project makes it much easier to figure out how to get things back on track, as in the following examples:

  • If it appears that a task is going to take longer than you planned, and therefore delay other tasks and maybe even the finish of the project itself, then you can enter the new estimated duration in Microsoft Project and see the calculated effects on other tasks and resource assignments. You can use Microsoft Project to try "what if" scenarios to find the best way to minimize the impact on the project's finish date and cost.

  • If a resource becomes unavailable or costs more than anticipated, you can quickly evaluate alternatives, including ways to substitute less expensive resources.

  • If you have to add a task to the schedule, you can add it, find ways to minimize the impact on the timeline and costs, and alert all those who are affected by the change.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint