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Chapter 13. Basic Excel > Spreadsheet Basics

13.1. Spreadsheet Basics

You use Excel, of course, to make a spreadsheet—an electronic ledger book composed of rectangles, known as cells, laid out in a grid (see Figure 13-1). As you type numbers into the rectangular cells, the program can automatically perform any number of calculations on them.

13.1.1. Opening a Spreadsheet

A new Excel document, called a workbook, is made up of several pages called worksheets. (More on the workbook/worksheet distinction in Chapter 15.) Each worksheet looks a great deal like a traditional spreadsheet, with lettered columns and numbered rows. The letters and numbers provide a quick way to refer to the cells in the grid—it's a lot like the game Battleship. (In fact, with a lot of time and some sophisticated programming skills, you could even play Battleship using Excel.)


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