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Preparing the Images

The map uses a total of 19 images, including the background map image, six photo image pop-ups, six text image pop-ups, and an image of a fleur-de-lis, copies of which serve as the buttons users see and interact with. Images can be modified for use in Acrobat in any image-editing program. This section describes the different types of images used in the project and why the specific design choices are made. You can apply these principles regardless of the program you use to prepare them in.

Download the six JPEG image files for the image pop-ups, which you alter in Photoshop or your image-editing program if you want. PDF versions of each image are also available for download so that you can see the converted format (filenames start with “i_”). Download the six JPEG image files for the text pop-ups. PDF versions of each image are also available for download so you can see the converted format (filenames start with “t_”).


This is how Amanda prepares the images for the project:

  • Map image. The map image is sized in Photoshop and converted to PDF in Acrobat. The goal is for viewers to see the entire map in the Acrobat or Adobe Reader window without having to scroll the page. Using a properly sized image looks more professional and doesn’t inconvenience the viewers. In the sample project, the map is sized at approximately 6.5 x 5.5 inches. At this size the entire map can be displayed along with the default toolbars on the program browser window (Figure 4.2).

    Figure 4.2. Make sure the document is sized correctly to view in a browser window without scrolling.

    Note

    Acrobat’s default toolbar arrangement uses two rows of toolbars, and the map could be larger and still visible in the program. But because Amanda’s viewers will see the map through their Web browser, the map needs to be sized smaller than if it is viewed in Acrobat to account for the browser’s toolbar height.


  • Text pop-ups. The text pop-ups are created in Photoshop and sized uniformly to use for one of the rollover features. Using a uniform image size makes the job simpler because Amanda can create the set of six rollover buttons in Acrobat and then quickly substitute the appropriate text popup. The text pop-ups are converted to PDF in Photoshop, described in the bonus section for this chapter on the book’s Web site entitled “Converting an Image to PDF in Photoshop.”

  • Image pop-ups. The image pop-ups are also created in Photoshop. Although the source images are different sizes, Amanda sets the size of the largest dimension (either height or width) to 2 inches for all of her images. The resizing contributes to a more uniform presentation and makes it simpler to use the images in the project’s buttons. The image pop-ups can remain in their JPEG format.

  • Hotspot buttons. The hotspot buttons that are visible on the map—those viewers click to see the pop-ups—are smaller versions of the Fleur-de-Lis logo. Amanda uses the image to create the first hotspot button and then copies the additional buttons in Acrobat. The button image is converted to PDF in Photoshop.

We won’t be discussing image editing in Photoshop, but we’ll see how to convert an image to PDF from within Acrobat itself.

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