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Certifying a PDF file

In the prior section of this lesson, you signed a PDF document to signify that you had approved the content and requested changes.You can also certify the contents of a PDF document. Certifying a document rather than signing it is useful if you want the user to be able to make approved changes to a document. As you saw in the previous section, if you sign a document, and anyone (even you as the signer) makes changes, the signature is invalidated. However, if you certify a document and a user makes approved changes, the certification is still valid. You can certify forms, for example, to guarantee that the content is valid when the user receives the form. You, as the creator of the form, can specify what tasks the user can perform. For example, you can specify that readers can fill in the form fields without invalidating the document. However, if a user tries to add or remove a form field or a page, the certification will be invalidated.

Now you'll certify a form to be sent to clients of a winery, asking them to estimate their purchases. By certifying the form, you are sure that the client fills out the form as you designed it, with no additions or deletions to the form fields.


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