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Styles

Word's styles feature enables you to define and apply sets of paragraph and/or font formatting to text throughout a document. This offers two main benefits over applying formatting using the basic techniques covered so far:

  • Consistency. All text with a particular style applied will have the same formatting (Figure 49)—unless additional formatting has also been applied.

    Figure 49. In this example, styles are applied to all text for consistent formatting.

  • Flexibility. Changing a style's definition is relatively easy. Once changed, the change automatically applies to all text formatted with that style (Figure 50).

    Figure 50. When two of the styles are modified, the formatting of text with those styles applied changes automatically. In this example, Normal style's paragraph formatting was changed from align left to justified and Heading 2 style's font formatting was changed from bold italic to regular with underline.

There are two kinds of styles:

  • Character styles affect the formatting of characters. The default character style is called Default Paragraph Font and is based on the font formatting of the currently applied paragraph style.

  • Paragraph styles affect the formatting of entire paragraphs. The default paragraph style is called Normal.

Tips

  • Like font or paragraph formatting, you can apply character or paragraph styles as you type or to text that has already been typed. Check Chapter 3 for details.

  • Styles are sometimes known as style sheets.

  • Word includes a number of predefined styles that you can apply to text.

  • Word's outline feature automatically applies predefined Heading styles as you create an outline. You can learn more about outlines in Chapter 8.

  • Word automatically applies some styles as you type. For example, if you enter text at the top of a document, center it, and apply other formatting to it, Word redefines the Title style and applies it to the paragraph.


To apply a style with the Formatting Palette

Choose a style from the Style pop-up menu on the Formatting Palette (Figure 51).

Figure 51. The Style pop-up menu on the Formatting Palette.


or

1.
Click the name of the style in the Style pop-up menu's text box to select it (Figure 52).

Figure 52. Click the style name to select it.


2.
Type in the exact name of the style that you want to apply (Figure 53).

Figure 53. Type in the name of the style that you want to apply.


3.
Press .

Tips

  • The Style pop-up menu displays only the styles that have been applied in the document, the first three Heading styles, and Default Paragraph Font (Figure 51).

  • To include all built-in template styles on the Style pop-up menu, hold down while clicking to display the menu.

  • The Style pop-up menu displays each style name using the formatting of that style (Figure 51).

  • You can distinguish between character styles and paragraph styles in the Style pop-up menu by the symbol to the right of the style name (Figure 51).

  • If you enter the name of a style that does not yet exist in the document in step 2 above, Word creates a new style for you, based on the selected paragraph. The formatting of the paragraph does not change, but the new style name appears on the Style pop-up menu.

  • The Clear Formatting option on the Formatting Palette's Style pop-up menu removes all manually applied formatting from a selection, returning its formatting to that of the style that is applied to the text. This is a brand new feature in Word X.


To apply a style with the Style dialog

1.
Choose Format > Style (Figure 5) to display the Style dialog (Figure 54).

Figure 54. The Style dialog.


2.
If necessary, use the List pop-up menu (Figure 55) to display a specific group of styles:

  • Styles in use are the styles already applied within the document.

  • All styles are the styles included within the template on which the document is based.

  • User-defined styles are the styles that you add to the document.

Figure 55. The List pop-up menu in the Style dialog.


3.
Click on the name of the style that you want to apply to select it.

4.
Click the Apply button.

Tips

  • You can distinguish between character styles and paragraph styles in the Style dialog by the symbol to the left of the style name (Figure 56).

    Figure 56. Another example of the Styles list in the Style dialog when Styles in use is chosen from the List pop-up menu.

  • Triangle markers appear to the left of the currently applied character and paragraph styles (Figure 56).

  • The Description area of the Style dialog provides information about the formatting that the style includes (Figure 54).


To modify a style

1.
Choose Format > Style (Figure 5) to display the Style dialog (Figure 54).

2.
If necessary, use the List pop-up menu (Figure 55) to display a specific group of styles.

3.
Click the name of the style that you want to modify to select it.

4.
Click the Modify button to display the Modify Style dialog (Figure 57).

Figure 57. The Modify Style dialog.


5.
To change the style's name, enter a new name in the Name text box.

6.
To change the style's formatting, choose an option from the Format pop-up menu (Figure 58). Each option displays the appropriate formatting dialog.

Figure 58. The Format pop-up menu at the bottom of the Modify Style dialog.


7.
Make changes as desired in the dialog that appears and click OK.

8.
Repeat steps 6 and 7 as necessary to make all desired formatting changes.

9.
To add the revised style to the template on which the document is based, turn on the Add to template check box.

10.
To instruct Word to automatically update the style's definition whenever you apply manual formatting to text with the style applied, turn on the Automatically update check box. (This step only applies if you are modifying a paragraph style.)

11.
Click OK to save changes in the Modify Style dialog.

12.
Click the Close button (Figure 59) to dismiss the Style dialog without applying the style to the currently selected text.

Figure 59. When you modify a style, the Cancel button at the bottom of the Style dialog turns into a Close button.


or

Click the Apply button (Figure 59) to dismiss the Style dialog and apply the style to the currently selected text.

To create a new style

1.
Choose Format > Style (Figure 5) to display the Style dialog (Figure 54).

2.
Click the New button to display the New Style dialog (Figure 60).

Figure 60. The New Style dialog.


3.
Enter a name for the style in the Name text box.

4.
Choose the type of style that you want to create from the Style type pop-up menu (Figure 61).

Figure 61. The Style type pop-up menu.


5.
To base the style on an existing style, choose the style from the Based on pop-up menu. This menu lists all styles of the type you selected in step 4 that are included in the template on which the document is based.

6.
To specify the style's formatting, choose an option from the Format pop-up menu (Figure 58). Each option displays the appropriate formatting dialog.

7.
Make changes as desired in the dialog that appears and click OK.

8.
Repeat steps 6 and 7 as necessary to set all desired formatting options.

9.
To add the new style to the template on which the document is based, turn on the Add to template check box.

10.
To instruct Word to automatically update the style whenever you apply manual formatting to text with the style applied, turn on the Automatically update check box. (This step only applies if you are creating a paragraph style.)

11.
Click OK to save changes in the New Style dialog.

12.
At the bottom of the Style dialog (Figure 59), click the Apply button to apply the new style to selected text; otherwise click the Close button to dismiss the Style dialog.

To delete a style

1.
Choose Format > Style (Figure 5) to display the Style dialog (Figure 54).

2.
If necessary, use the List pop-up menu (Figure 55) to display a specific group of styles.

3.
Click to select the name of the style that you want to delete.

4.
Click the Delete button.

5.
A warning dialog (Figure 62) or Office Assistant balloon appears. Click Yes to delete the style.

Figure 62. Word confirms that you want to delete a style.


Tip

  • When you delete a style, the default style (Normal for paragraph styles and Default Paragraph Font for character styles) is applied to any text to which the deleted style was applied.


To use the Style Gallery

1.
Choose Format > Theme (Figure 5).

2.
In the Themes dialog that appears, click the Style Gallery button to display the Style Gallery dialog.

3.
Click the name of a template in the Template scrolling list to select it. An example of the document with the template's styles applied appears in the Preview area of the dialog (Figure 63).

Figure 63. The Style Gallery showing a template's styles applied to the active document.


4.
To apply the styles of a selected template to the current document, click OK.

or

To close the Style Gallery dialog without changing styles, click Cancel.

Tip

  • I tell you about Word's themes feature in Chapter 14.


To attach a template to a document

1.
Choose Tools > Templates and Add-Ins (Figure 64) to display the Templates and Add-ins dialog (Figure 65).

Figure 64. Choose Templates and Add-Ins from the Tools menu.


Figure 65. The Templates and Add-ins dialog.


2.
To update the current document's styles with styles from the template you are attaching, turn on the Automatically update document styles check box.

3.
Click the Attach button.

4.
Use the Choose a File dialog that appears (Figure 66) to locate, select, and open the template you want to attach to the document.

Figure 66. Use this dialog to locate, select, and open the template you want to attach.


5.
Back in the Templates and Add-ins dialog, click OK.

Tips

  • You can attach any Word template to a Word document—not just one of the templates that came with Microsoft Word.

  • When you attach a template to a document, you make all the styles stored in the template available for use in the document.

  • Attaching a template to a document is a good way to get an existing document to use standard formatting stored in a template file, even if the template was not available when the document was originally created.


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