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Review

Review questions

1How do the RGB and CMYK color gamuts affect the relationship between on-screen colors and printed colors?
2How can you create a closer match between your on-screen colors and printed colors?
3What is the benefit of printing interim drafts of your artwork to a black-and-white desktop printer?
4What does the term color separation mean?
5What are two ways to output spot colors?
6What are the advantages of one- or two-color printing?
7What is trapping?
8What is a simple method you can use to create trap?

Review answers

1Each color model has a gamut of color that overlaps but does not precisely match the others. Because monitors display color using the RGB color gamut, and printed artwork uses the smaller CMYK color gamut, there may be times when a printed color cannot precisely match an on-screen color.
2You can select one of Illustrator’s built-in color management profiles to better simulate the relationship between on-screen colors and printed colors. You can choose View > Proof Setup and select an output device profile. Then choose View > Proof Colors to get an on-screen version of how the artwork will look when printed to the selected device.
3It’s a good idea to print black-and-white drafts of your artwork on a desktop printer to check the layout and the accuracy of text and graphics in your publication before incurring the expense of printing to a color printer or imagesetter (for separations).
4Color separation refers to breaking down composite artwork into its component colors—for example, using the four process colors (cyan, magenta, yellow, and black) to reproduce a large portion of the visible color spectrum.
5You can convert a spot color to its process color equivalents if a precise color match is not required, or you can output a spot color to its own separation.
6One- or two-color printing is less expensive than four-color printing, and you can use spot colors for precise color matching.
7Trapping is a technique developed by commercial print shops to slightly overprint the colors along common edges, and it is used to compensate for any gaps or color shifts that may occur between adjoining or overlapping objects when printed.
8You can specify objects to overprint, or print on top of, any of the artwork under them. Overprinting is the simplest method you can use to create a trap, which compensates for misregistration on press.


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