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A Quick Tour of Adobe Illustrator CS2

A Quick Tour of Adobe Illustrator CS2


This interactive demonstration of Adobe Illustrator CS2 is designed to give an overview of new and exciting features in the program. You will discover new features like Live Trace and Live Paint, and learn key fundamentals of the program.

This interactive demonstration of Adobe Illustrator CS2 is designed to give an overview of the program and some of the exciting new features in about an hour.

Getting started

You will work with one file during this tour. All art files are located on the Adobe Classroom in a Book CD that is located on the inside back cover of this book. Make sure that you copy the AICIB folder from the CD to your hard drive before starting this exercise. Before you begin, you need to restore the default preferences for Adobe Illustrator CS2. Then you’ll open the finished art file for this lesson to see what you will create on your own.

Note

If you are new to Adobe Illustrator or to vector-drawing applications, you might want to begin with Lesson 1, “Getting to Know the Work Area.”


1.
To ensure that the tools and palettes function exactly as described in this tour, delete or deactivate (by renaming) the Adobe Illustrator CS2 preferences file. See “Restoring default preferences” on page 3.

2.
Start Adobe Illustrator CS2. When the Welcome Screen appears, choose Open Document, or select File > Open.

3.
Open the tour_done.ai file in the Lesson00 folder located inside the Lessons folder within the AICIB folder on your hard drive. If a Missing Profile warning appears, click OK.

Note

The tour file uses an OpenType font named Chaparral Pro. Illustrator CS2 comes with many OpenType fonts for you to use. OpenType is an exciting advancement in font technology. Read more about OpenType in Lesson 6, “Working with Type.”


Zoom Out to make the finished artwork smaller, and leave it on your screen as you work. Use the Hand tool () to reposition the artwork to the upper left of the window, then drag the lower right corner of the document window to make the window smaller. If you don’t want to leave the image open as you work, choose File > Close.

The completed Tour illustration.

1.
For the tour file, you will start with a blank document. Create a new document in Adobe Illustrator by choosing File > New or by using the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+N (Windows) or Command+N (Mac OS).

2.
When the New Document window appears, leave the defaults settings unchanged and click OK. A new blank document window appears.

3.
Choose View > Show Rulers, or use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+R (Windows) or Command+R (Mac OS) to show rulers on the top and left part of your artboard.

4.
Select the Rectangle tool () and click once on the artboard; do not click and drag. The Rectangle window appears.

5.
Enter the Width value 600 pt, and the Height 50 pt, then click OK. A rectangle appears on the page. You will reposition it on your page in the next step.

With any shape tool, you can click once on the artboard to enter exact values for the shape.

Note

If your document is not measuring in increments of points, you can still enter “pt” after the value to create the rectangle in points.

6.
Choose Window > Transform to view the Transform palette. The Transform palette allows you to enter exact coordinates for vertical and horizontal placement as well as other transformations. This palette is discussed in Lesson 3, “Transforming Objects.”

Using the Selection tool (), click and drag the rectangle to the upper part of the page. Use the Transform palette to enter an exact location. Click once in the upper left corner of the Point of reference indicator (), then type in an x coordinate of 6 pt and a y coordinate of 675 pt. Press Enter.

Enter Coordinates in the Transform palette.

7.
Choose File > Save. In the Save As window, enter the name hopping.ai. Leave the file format set to Adobe Illustrator, and click Save. In the Illustrator Options window, leave the options at their defaults and click OK.

Setting up the blend

Create a duplicate, or clone, of your rectangle, so that you have a shape to start and finish the gradient blend.

1.
Click once on the rectangle with the Selection tool (), then hold down the Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) key. Click on the rectangle and drag it toward the bottom of the page. Notice that the cursor changes to a double cursor (). Release the mouse first, then the Alt/Option key. A copy appears, leaving the original intact.

2.
Using the Transform palette, make sure the reference point is still in the upper left corner and type in the x coordinate text box 6 pt, and the y coordinate 275 pt for the bottom rectangle; press Enter.

Note

As a default, the zero point of the ruler is in the lower left corner. This value is based upon basic PostScript principles. Remember, the higher the y value, the further up the object is positioned on the page.

3.
If the Swatches palette is not visible, choose Window > Swatches.

4.
With the Selection tool, click once on the topmost rectangle to select it. Notice at the bottom of the toolbox that there are controls for the fill and the stroke. The stroke is essentially a border, the fill is the interior of a shape. When the fill is forward, any selected color will become assigned to the interior of the selected object. Activate the fill by clicking the solid swatch. Read more about strokes and fills in Lesson 5, “Color and Painting.”

Fill is forward.

Stroke is forward.

For this example, you will assign colors using the Selection tool and the Swatches palette. Before you get started, notice that when you move the cursor over the swatches on the Swatches palette, a tooltip appears, providing you with the name of the color. Keep this in mind, as you will need to reference certain colors in the next few steps.

Move the cursor over the swatches in the Swatches palette to see color names.

5.
Make sure the topmost rectangle is still selected and choose the Fill swatch at the bottom of the toolbox. This brings the fill forward. Then choose Starry Night Blue from the Swatches palette; the rectangle now has a dark blue fill.

6.
Now select the bottom rectangle and assign the fill color Pure Cyan.

Note

If you inadvertently apply a color to the stroke, remove it by clicking on the None icon () when the Stroke is forward.

7.
Choose Select > All, Ctrl+A (Windows) or use Command+A (Mac OS) to select both rectangles. Select Stroke from the bottom of the toolbox to bring it forward, and click on None. This removes any default stroke that is applied to your rectangles.

Remove stroke by choosing None.

8.
Now you are ready to create the blend. With both rectangles still selected, select the Blend tool (), then click once on the top rectangle, and again on the bottom rectangle. You are instructing Illustrator to create a blend (like morphing) from the top rectangle to the bottom rectangle. A gradual blend from one color of blue to another appears. Blends are discussed in more detail in Lesson 8, “Blending Shapes and Colors.”

9.
To avoid moving this blend as you build the rest of this file, choose Object > Lock > Selection, or use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+2 (Windows) or Command+2 (Mac OS).

10.
Choose File > Save, keep the file open.

Placing Photoshop images in Illustrator CS2

Placing a native Photoshop file into Illustrator is not a new feature, but in Illustrator CS2 you can assign Layer Comps before you place the image on the artboard. Layer Comps are a Photoshop feature that allow you to save combinations of layers, using the Layer Comp palette. Layer Comps can be based upon visibility, position, and Layer appearance. Get more details about Layer Comps in Lesson 13, “Combining Illustrator CS2 Graphics with the Creative Suite.”

1.
Choose File > Place.

2.
When the Place window appears, check the Link checkbox in the lower left corner and navigate to your AICIB folder to Lesson00, and select the file shoes_color.psd. Click Place.

Illustrator recognizes when a file has been saved with Layer Comps, and opens a Photoshop Import Options window. The file in this example has been saved with three different Layer Comps.

3.
In the Photoshop Import Options window, check the Show Preview checkbox and use the Layer Comp drop-down menu to select the comp named green_sneakers, and click OK. If you receive a color warning, disregard it for this example and click OK. The image of green sneakers is placed on the page.

4.
Choose Select > Deselect to deselect the placed image.

Illustrator recognizes Layer Comps saved in Photoshop files.

5.
Repeat step 2-4 two more times, importing the two remaining Layer Comps. Choose the purple_sneakers and the red_sneakers Layer Comps. You should have three different pairs of colored sneakers, stacked on top of each other, on the artboard. Each is generated from the same Photoshop file.

6.
Choose File > Save.

Aligning the shoes

In this next step, the exact position of the shoe images is not important, but you will use the Align palette to align them to each other. Before starting this part of the lesson, use the Selection tool () to reposition the placed shoe images so they are not stacked on top of each other.

1.
Continuing to use the Selection tool, select the green sneaker image and drag it to the upper left corner of the blended rectangle, leaving about a half inch from the edges. Then select the purple sneaker image and position in the middle left side of the blended rectangle. Lastly, select the red sneaker image and drag it to the lower left side of the blended rectangle.

Position the shoe images on the left side of the blended square.

2.
Choose Select > Deselect. With the Selection tool, click to select the green sneaker image, hold down the Shift key and click on the purple sneaker image, and then the red sneaker image. By holding down the Shift key, you can select multiple objects.

3.
Choose Window > Align to show the Align palette. The Align palette can be used to align objects to the artboard or to other objects.

4.
With the images still selected, choose the Horizontal Align Left button on the Align palette.

5.
Then, choose the Vertical Distribute Center button. The images are aligned on the left and are distributed evenly from each other.

Choose Horizontal Align Left and then Vertical Distribute Center.

Result.

6.
Choose File > Save.

Using the Live Trace tool

Live Trace is a new feature in Adobe Illustrator CS2 that provides incredible tracing options. Use it to trace logos, artwork, or even create vector color images from photographs. In this example, you will trace a color photograph to create a piece of black and white line art.

1.
Choose File > Place. If you are not already in the Lesson00 folder, navigate to it and select the image named dancing.psd. Click Place.

Using the Selection tool (), position the image so that it is on the right side of the blended square. Exact position is not important.

2.
With the image selected, click and hold the Tracing presets and options button to the right of Live Trace in the Control palette.

If your Control Palette is not visible, choose Window > Control Palette.

Notice all the presets tracing options available. For this example, scroll to the bottom and release on Tracing Options.

The Live Trace options.

When the Tracing Options windows appears, check the Preview box (on the right). For this example, leave the preset at the default.

As you see, the color image is converted to a black and white image. Click on the arrow () in the Threshold drop-down menu on the left side of the dialog box. A slider appears. Use this slider to adjust what Illustrator automatically chooses to be white or black. This can be helpful when working with images with fine lines that might get lost in the translation. Click the Trace button. The Live Trace feature is discussed in more detail in Lesson 5, “Color and Painting.”

The new Live Trace feature can convert pixels to vector art.

Note

Live Trace lives up to its name. If you were to edit the live trace image in Photoshop, the file would update the Live Trace image in Illustrator.

3.
With the traced object still selected, choose the Expand button on the Control palette. This breaks down the traced image into individual components.

4.
Choose Select > Deselect and then, using the Direct Selection tool (), click on the white background behind the traced image. This activates only the white area surrounding the image. This is a bounding box that we want to remove.

5.
Choose Select > Same > Fill Color. This automatically selects any other object with a white fill.

6.
Press the Delete or Backspace key to remove the white objects, such as the background, but keep the traced image intact.

Traced image with background selected.

Traced image with background removed.

7.
Choose File > Save. Keep the file open.

Using the Control palette for typesetting

Now you will have the opportunity to use the new Control palette in Illustrator CS2 for typesetting. Before getting started, make sure that you choose Window > Workspace > [Default]. This ensures that the Control Palette is at the top of your document window.

Choose Window > Workspace > [Minimal] if you are working on a tablet. This closes many of the palettes, which you can now access from the Control palette, and positions the Control palette at the bottom of the workspace.


1.
Select the Type tool (), and click once on the artboard. Don’t worry about location, the text will be repositioned later in the lesson.

Note

Make sure that you click and release on the artboard where there are no other objects. Also, do not click and drag, this creates a small, limited text area. More on type is discussed in Lesson 6, “Working with Type.”

2.
Type the word HOPPIN’. While still on the Type tool, choose Select > All, or use Ctrl+A (Windows) or Command+A (Mac OS).

3.
Using the Font Size textbox in the Control palette, change the selected text to 85 pts. Press Enter, after typing the new size.

4.
Make sure the text is still selected and then do the following:

  • Click and drag over the Font Name in the Font text field on the Control palette.

    Select the font name in the Control palette.

  • Press the Up () or Down () arrow key on your keyboard. This navigates up and down through your font list, in alphabetical order. Using this method, change to the font named Chaparral Pro, an OpenType font. If you are at the default font of Myriad, you will need to press the up arrow many times, or you can also use the shortcut to get directly to Chaparral Pro by typing chap while the font name is selected.

5.
In the Font Style drop-down menu, select Bold.

Change the font dynamically by selecting the font name in the Control palette and using the Up and Down arrow keys.

Would you rather see the entire Character palette? Simply click on the underlined word Character in the Control palette. You can also use the Control palette to access the Stroke, Paragraph, and Transparency palettes.


6.
Switch to the Selection tool (). The text area becomes active. If the Transform palette is not visible, choose Window > Transform and type in the x coordinate of 200 pt and the y coordinate of 675 pt. Press Enter.

Position the text area using the Transform palette.

Result.

Creating outlines of text

In the next part of this exercise, you will convert the text from font to outlines. An outline of a font is a vector shape of the font. It no longer is editable text but can be used in a variety of ways.

1.
Select the text area with the Selection tool ().

2.
Choose Type > Create Outlines. The text is converted into vector shapes.

3.
The outlined text is grouped together as a default. Before accessing individual letters and attributes, choose Object > Ungroup, or use Shift+Ctrl+G (Windows) or Shift+Command+G (Mac OS).

4.
While the letters are still selected, choose Select > Save Selection. When the Save Selection window appears, name the selection hoppin’ and click OK. This makes it easier to reselect the text later in the exercise.

5.
Choose File > Save.

Using the Appearance palette

1.
If the Appearance palette is not open, choose Window > Appearance. The Appearance palette is an incredibly powerful palette that allows you to specifically control an object’s attributes such as stroke, fills and other effects. Discover more about Effects in Lesson 11, “Applying Appearance Attributes, Graphic Styles, and Effects.”

2.
If the text is no longer selected, choose Select > hoppin’ to reactivate the outlined text. If you do not have a saved selection, you can also select the first outlined letter H then hold down the Shift key and click on each outlined letter. This adds them to the selection.

Note in the Appearance palette that the selection is listed as a Compound Path and that both a stroke and fill are listed as attributes.

The Appearance palette can be used for simple fills and strokes, as well as complex objects attributes that include multiple strokes and fills.

3.
If the Swatches palette is not visible, choose Window > Swatches. Select the word Stroke on the Appearance palette and then click on the White swatch on the Swatches palette. The stroke becomes white.

4.
Choose Fill in the Appearance palette and click on the Red swatch. Your text now has a White stroke and a Red fill.

Applying Effects

Now comes the fun part, using the Appearance palette to create some simple effects that might be difficult to create otherwise.

1.
If the HOPPIN’ text outline is no longer selected, choose Select > hoppin’ to reactivate the selection.

2.
Choose Stroke in the Appearance palette.

3.
Choose Effect > Path > Offset Path. When the Offset Path window appears, enter the amount of offset as 2 pt. Click OK. The stroke on the text has now been offset by 2 pt, but the fill remains unchanged.

Choose Stroke.

Then the Offset Path Effect.

Result.

4.
With the HOPPIN’ text still selected, select Fill on the Appearance palette.

5.
Click on Opacity on the Control palette to view the Transparency palette.

6.
Change the Blending mode to Hue, by holding down on Normal and scrolling to the Hue mode. The Hue blending mode will be more apparent later in the lesson when text is overlapped.

Access the Transparency palette from the Control palette.

Saving the Appearance as a Graphic Style

Perhaps you like the combination of attributes you have applied to an object and want to store them for later use. This can easily be done by saving a Graphic Style.

1.
If the Text outline HOPPIN’ is not selected, choose Select > hoppin’.

2.
If the Graphic Styles palette is not visible, choose Window > Graphic Styles. The Graphic Styles palette can be used to store combinations of attributes applied to objects. This is discussed more in Lesson 11, “Applying Appearance Attributes, Graphics Styles, and Effects.”

3.
With the HOPPIN’ text outline still selected, choose New Graphic Style from the Graphic Styles palette menu. When the Graphic Styles Options window appears, type offset-stroke in the Style Name text box; click OK. The Graphic Style you just created appears as the last thumbnail on the palette.

Save combinations of object attributes as a style in the Graphic Styles palette.

4.
Choose Select > Deselect and choose the Type tool (). Type the word SHOES anywhere on the artboard, but off your existing artwork. Make sure that the text attributes are still set as Chaparral Pro, Bold, 85 pt. If not, enter those values using the Control palette.

5.
Choose the Selection tool (), and select the Shoes text area. Using the Transform palette (make sure the point of reference indicator is still in the upper left corner), position the word SHOES at the x coordinate of 200 pt and the y coordinate of 625 pt. Press Enter after typing these values in the Transform palette.

6.
With the SHOES text area still selected, click on the thumbnail of the Graphic Style you saved in the Graphic Style palette. Your saved attributes are applied to the text.

The SHOES text overlaps HOPPIN’, and has the same Graphic Style applied.

7.
Choose File > Save. Leave this file open for the rest of the tour exercise.

Using the Live Paint feature

You can now automatically fill paint regions in Illustrator CS2. You explore this feature in the tour, but get more details in Lesson 5, “Color and Painting.”

1.
With your hopping.ai file still open, choose File > Open and locate the image named target.ai in the Lesson00 folder.

2.
Choose Select > All, or Ctrl+A (Windows)/Command+A (Mac OS).

3.
Choose Edit > Copy, or Ctrl+C (Windows)/Command+C (Mac OS).

4.
Choose File > Close, and return to the hopping.ai document.

5.
Choose Edit > Paste, or Ctrl+V (Windows)/Command+V (Mac OS). The target art appears on the artboard.

6.
With the target artwork still selected, choose Select > Save Selection just in case you need to reference it again in the future. In the Save Selection dialog window, name the selection target. Click OK. Leave the target selected. At this point it does not matter where the target is positioned.

7.
Choose Object > Live Paint > Make to create this as a Live Paint group.

8.
Choose the Live Paint Bucket tool () and cross it over the target shape (don’t click!). Even though this shape is created from many circles, Live Paint recognizes the visual shapes and highlights them as you cross over them.

9.
Choose red from the Swatches palette, cross over the outside ring, until the ring is highlighted, then click. The red is applied to the outside ring. Apply the Live Paint (red) fill to every other ring toward the middle of the circles.

The Live Paint feature paints automatically detects paint regions.

10.
Now choose the None swatch () from the Swatches palette. Using the Live Paint Bucket tool, apply the None fill to every other ring, creating an alternating pattern.

11.
Choose File > Save.

Applying a blending method

Next you will apply a blending mode to the target. A blending mode determines how the object and its colors interact with the underlying objects.

1.
If the Transparency palette is not visible, choose Window > Transparency.

2.
Using the Selection tool (), select the target and choose Overlay from the Blend drop-down menu.

Changing the Blending method of an object changes the way it interacts with objects below.

Result.

3.
Choose the Selection tool and click and drag the Live Paint target object to a position so that it appears as though the dancer’s foot is kicking the inside circle. This will position the target off the blended background.

Creating a clipping mask

The image is almost finished! Just a little clean-up work around the edges, and it will be complete. To clean up the edges, you will create a clipping mask. A clipping mask essentially blocks or covers the object area not included in the object defined as the mask. This can be adjusted, of course. Details relating to this are found in Lesson 7, “Working with Layers.”

1.
Click and hold down on the Rectangle tool () to select the Rounded Rectangle tool ().

2.
Click once on the artboard. This opens the Rounded Rectangle options window.

3.
Enter a Width of 585 pt and a Height of 400 pt, leave the Corner Radius set for the default of 12 pt. Then press the OK button. The rounded rectangle appears on the page. It does not matter what color the fill or stroke are for this object.

4.
Choose the Selection tool (), click on the stroke, and drag the rounded rectangle to position it so that it is encompassing the existing artwork. This may exclude some of the target, as well as the blend.

5.
Choose Object > Unlock all, this will unlock the blend you created earlier.

6.
Choose Select > All.

The rounded rectangle is positioned over the artwork.

7.
Choose Object > Clipping Mask > Make.

8.
Choose Select > Deselect. Congratulations, your artwork is completed, and you have completed the tour of Adobe Illustrator CS2.

9.
Choose File > Save and File > Close.

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