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Part: Three Type, Symbols, and Graphs > How to Handle Typical Type

Chapter 10. How to Handle Typical Type

You might think it's funny that people tell me Illustrator is their favorite page-layout program. Well, if much of their work is single-page, graphically intense material anyway, why not? I think these folks are on to something; Illustrator (child of Adobe that it is) understands type very well, and just because you're using an illustration program doesn't mean you have to put up with substandard text tools.

Illustrator's type capabilities are so vast that we need to explore them over the course of two chapters. This chapter examines the relatively basic stuff—how to create text blocks and apply formatting attributes such as typeface and style. I'll close out the chapter with some nifty techniques for working with tabs. This chapter looks at the sane and rational aspects of type.

Chapter 11 looks at the more bizarre effects you can create with type: You can affix type to a curve, set text inside free-form text blocks, apply effects to Adobe's specialized Multiple Master fonts, convert letter outlines to fully editable paths, and even present text in the Japanese vertical style. Look for all that, plus a few administrative-but-vital text-based procedures, in the next chapter.

Finally, if you're itching for better text capabilities on the Web, make sure to read Chapter 21. Illustrator 10's support for SVG and SWF are a brave new world for online type hounds.



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