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Part: Five Going Public > Illustrator and Other Programs

Chapter 23. Illustrator and Other Programs

Way back when Illustrator was born in the mid-1980s, its creators expected it to be used in exactly two ways. Either you could print drawings out directly from Illustrator (in glorious black-and-white, no less), or you could take them into a layout application such as PageMaker and print them as part of a layout. That was it.

Things have changed. Having once driven typesetting machines and then imagesetters, all in the service of the printing press, computers have moved beyond paper to serve Web sites and edit digital camera footage. In addition, the blurring of lines between the raster and vector worlds has let Illustrator gain access to areas where it used to be irrelevant. Today you find Illustrator users not just at newspapers and magazines, but at Web design companies, TV stations, and film studios. The downside to Illustrator's multimedia expansion is the bewildering range of options and choices to be made when trying to make Illustrator files for a medium in which you're not familiar. In this chapter I'll try to smooth out the bumps you may encounter in getting Illustrator to play nice with, well, everybody.

A general tip for using Illustrator in other programs: If you can't get an Illustrator file to import into another program, first try saving and then importing an EPS version of it. You can also try saving the document into an older version of the Illustrator format.



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