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Chapter 4. Select, Move, and Size > To select all objects on a page:

To select all objects on a page:

Choose Objects from the Select All fly-out on the Edit menu (Figure 7), or press Ctrl+A on the keyboard, or double-click on the Pick Tool in the Toolbox.

Figure 7. To select all objects on a page, choose Objects from the Select All fly-out on the Edit menu.


To deselect an object:

1.
Select the Pick Tool.

2.
Click outside the selected object.

or

Press the Esc key on the keyboard.

Tip

To deselect one object within a multiple selection, hold down the Shift key and click on that object.


To move an object:

1.
Position the Pick Tool over the object.

2.
Press the left mouse button and drag the object to its new location. As you drag, a marquee and wireframe representation of the object will follow along with your pointer until you release the mouse button (Figure 8).

Figure 8. As you move an object, a wireframe representation of the object appears on the screen. The object itself remains stationary until you release the mouse.


What Are Those Funny Double-headed Arrows Around My Object?

If you click on a selected object—one whose handles are already visible—the handles will change to double-headed arrows (Figure 9). These arrows are used to skew and rotate an object and will be discussed in Chapter 12 and Chapter 14. To get the big black handles back again, click once on the object.

Figure 9. Double-headed arrows appear around an object when you double-click on it or click once with the object already selected.



There are two ways to copy an object: by copying the object to the Windows Clipboard and then pasting it into the document, or by duplicating the object. The end result of these two procedures is the same, but the amount of computing power they use is very different.

To copy an object using the Windows Clipboard:

1.
Use the Pick Tool to select the object you want to copy.

2.
Choose Copy from the Edit menu (Figure10) or press Ctrl+C on the keyboard to copy the object to the Windows Clipboard.

Figure 10. Choose Copy from the Edit Menu.


3.
Choose Paste from the Edit menu (Figure 11) or press Ctrl+V on the keyboard. A copy of the object will appear, selected, directly on top of the original. To move the copy, place the the Pick Tool over the copy (not on the object's black handles), press the left mouse button, and drag the object to another position (Figure 12).

Figure 11. Choose Paste from the Edit menu.


Figure 12. As you drag the copy to a new position, a wireframe representation of the object appears on the screen.


Copying using the Clipboard vs. Duplicating

If you copy an object to the Clipboard, you can then paste it to other pages in your CorelDraw document. It will also be available to other Windows programs. For instance, you could paste a rectangle copied from CorelDraw into Microsoft Word. However, copying and pasting an object, especially a complex one, will put your computer to work for a long time.

CorelDraw's duplicate command bypasses the Clipboard, making it a fast operation. In addition, you can specify exactly where a duplicate will appear in relation to the original (see page 50), whereas a copy will always appear on top of the original.


To copy an object by dragging:

1.
Position the Pick Tool over the object you want to copy.

2.
Press the right mouse button and drag the mouse. As you drag, a wireframe version of the object will appear on the screen (Figure 13).

Figure 13. As you drag with the right mouse button depressed, a wireframe copy of the original appears on the screen.


3.
Release the mouse button. A pop-up menu will appear. Click on Copy Here (Figure 14).

Figure 14. Select Copy Here from the pop-up menu.


To duplicate an object:

1.
Select the object to be duplicated using the Pick Tool.

2.
Choose Duplicate from the Edit menu (Figure 15) or press Ctrl+D on the keyboard. The duplicate will appear, selected, to the right and slightly above the original by default (Figure 16).

Figure 15. Choose Duplicate from the Edit menu.


Figure 16. The duplicate appears slightly above and to the right of the original.


Tip

Another quick way to duplicate an object is to press the key on your keypad. This duplicates the object, and places it directly on top of the original.


Smart duplication is a CorelDraw 9 feature that helps you quickly create evenly spaced duplicate objects.

To create a series of objects using smart duplication:

1.
Use the Pick Tool to select the object you want to duplicate (Figure 17).

Figure 17. Use the Pick Tool to select the object you want to duplicate.


2.
Choose Duplicate from the Edit menu or press Ctrl+D on the keyboard. A duplicate of the original will appear selected (Figure 18).

Figure 18. A duplicate of the original object appears selected.


3.
Using the Pick Tool, move the duplicate object to its position in the series (Figure 19). Be sure to leave the duplicate object selected.

Figure 19. Reposition the duplicate object.


4.
Choose Duplicate from the Edit menu or press Ctrl+D on the keyboard to duplicate the repositioned duplicate object. A second duplicate will appear selected, positioned the same distance from the first duplicate as the first duplicate is from the original object (Figure 20).

Figure 20. When you create a second duplicate, it appears selected the same distance from the first duplicate as the first duplicate is from the original object.


5.
Continue pressing Ctrl+D on the keyboard or choosing Duplicate from the Edit menu until there are as many evenly spaced duplicate objects as you need (Figure 21).

Figure 21. Continue creating as many evenly spaced duplicates as you need.


Like duplication, cloning bypasses the Windows Clipboard to quickly create a copy of the original. However, unlike duplication—where the two objects only look alike and are not connected in any other way—cloning creates a link between original and copy. Any changes made to the original also effect the clone. This would be handy, for instance, if you had 100 cloned circles in a drawing and wanted to change their fill color from red to blue. All you would need to do is select the original circle and fill it with blue. All the clones would automatically fill with blue.

To clone an object:

1.
Select the object with the Pick Tool (Figure 22).

Figure 22. Use the Pick Tool to select the object you want to clone.


2.
Choose Clone from the Edit menu (Figure 23). A clone of the original will appear selected (Figure 24).

Figure 23. Select Clone from the Edit menu.


Figure 24. A clone of the original appears, by default, above and to the right of the original.


Tip

The link between a clone and the original only goes one way. If you alter the original, the clone is changed also. But, if you alter the clone, the original is unaffected.


Tip

You can keep an eye on whether you've selected a clone by watching the Status Bar. If a clone is selected, it will state something such as "Clone Curve on Layer 1." If the original is selected, the Status Bar will read something such as "Control Curve on Layer 1."


The Options dialog box lets you set the properties for all the tools in the Toolbox, as well as customize your work environment. Using the Options dialog box, you can set precisely where a clone or duplicate will appear in relationship to the original.

To set precisely where a clone or duplicate will appear:

1.
Choose Options from the Tools menu (Figure 25) or press Ctrl+J on the keyboard. The Options dialog box will open (Figure 26).

Figure 25. To access the Options dialog box, choose Options on the Tools menu.


Figure 26. The Options dialog box is used to set the properties for CorelDraw's tools and workspace.


2.
In the tree view box at the left of the Options dialog box, click Edit (Figure 27). The right side of the dialog box will change to display the Edit settings (Figure 28).

Figure 27. Click Edit to display the Edit panel on the right side of the dialog box.


Figure 28. After clicking Edit, use the Duplicate placement area to set where clones and duplicates will appear.


3.
In the Duplicate placement area on the Edit panel, enter the distance you want cloned or duplicated objects to appear from the original by typing numbers in the Horizontal and Vertical text boxes. If you want the copy to appear exactly on top of the original, enter 0 in both text boxes.

4.
Place a check mark in the box next to Save with document only if you want to save these changes only with this document.

5.
Click OK. The Options dialog box will close.

It's important to consider how your drawings are set up on the screen. For instance, when you are working on a complex drawing with many small details, it can be very helpful to view the drawing in two windows. The window on the left would be in a large display size—perhaps 400%—to edit the detail, while the other window would be in a smaller view size so you could see the changes made to the entire drawing.

To view the same drawing in two windows:

1.
Open a drawing or get one started in a new document.

2.
Choose New Window from the Window menu (Figure 29). A new window will appear on top of the original (you won't be able to see the first one). If you look up at the title bar, you will notice the graphic's name has a :2 appended to it.

Figure 29. Choose New Window from the Window menu.


3.
Tile the windows by choosing Tile Vertically from the Window menu (Figure 30). The two windows will appear side-by-side (Figure 31).

Figure 30. Choose Tile Vertically to tile the two windows side-by-side.


Figure 31. The same drawing in two windows shown in different display sizes.


To view two different documents at the same time:

1.
Open the two drawings.

2.
Choose Tile Vertically from the Window menu. The two windows will appear side-by-side.

As you probably know, it's easy to copy files or move files between windows in Windows using drag-and-drop. CorelDraw 9 allows you to do the same thing with your drawings. You can copy an object in one window and paste it into another. In addition, you can move an object from one document to another with a simple drag-and-drop operation.

To copy an object from one document to another:

1.
Open two documents.

2.
Tile the documents by choosing Tile Vertically from the Window menu.

3.
Use the Pick Tool to select the object you want to copy and choose Copy from the Edit menu or press Ctrl+C on the keyboard.

4.
Click the title bar of the other document's window, the one in which you want to paste the object (Figure 32). This will make that window active.

Figure 32. Open two documents and tile them vertically.


5.
Choose Paste from the Edit menu or press Ctrl+V on the keyboard. The object will appear in the second document (Figure 33).

Figure 33. Click the title bar of the second window to make it active, and then choose Paste from the Edit menu. The copied object appears in the second window.


To move an object from one document to another:

1.
Open two documents.

2.
Choose Tile Vertically from the Window menu to tile the documents.

3.
Place the point of the Pick Tool on the outline of the object you want to move. Press the left mouse button and drag it to the other document (Figure 34).

Figure 34. Use the Pick Tool to drag the object from one document window to another. As you drag the object, a wireframe version of the object appears.


4.
Release the mouse button when you are happy with the object's new position. The object will move to the other document (Figure 35).

Figure 35. When you release the mouse button, the object moves to the other document window.


Tip

You can also move or copy an object from one document to another by dragging the object with the right mouse button. When you release the button, a pop-up menu will appear, asking whether you wish to move or copy the object there.


Handles appear in a rectangular formation around an object when it is selected with the Pick Tool. These handles have various functions:

  • The handles that appear to the right center and left center of the object affect the object's horizontal scale— they make an object wider or narrower (Figure 36).

    Figure 36. The handles at the left center and right center of a selected object affect the object's width.

  • The handles that appear at the top center and bottom center of an object affect the object's vertical scale and make an object taller or shorter (Figure 37).

    Figure 37. The handles at the top center and bottom center of a selected object affect the object's height.

  • The handles that appear at the corners affect the object's proportional scale. These handles let you change the horizontal and vertical size of an object equally (Figure 38).

    Figure 38. The handles at the corners of a selected object affect the object's height and width equally.

The Property Bar can be Used to Exactly Size and Position an Object

To use the Property Bar to size and position an object, select the object with the Pick Tool. Enter measurements in the text boxes at the left of the bar, then press Enter on the keyboard.




To change an object's width:

1.
Select the object using the Pick Tool.

2.
Position the pointer over either the left center or right center handle (Figure 39). Press the left mouse button and horizontally drag the handle. As you drag, a wireframe representation of the resized object appears. In addition, the mouse pointer will change to a double-headed horizontal arrow. If you drag the handle toward the object, it will become narrower (Figure 40). If you drag the handle away from the object, it will become wider (Figure 41).

Figure 39. Drag either the left or right handle to make an object wider or narrower.


Figure 40. As you drag inward, a wire-frame version of the resized object appears on the screen. The original remains stationary until the mouse is released.


Figure 41. As you drag outward, a wire-frame version of the resized object appears. The original remains stationary until the mouse is released.


3.
Release the mouse button when you are happy with the width.

Tip

You can keep an eye on the object's new width by watching the horizontal ruler bar at the top of the screen.


To change an object's height:

1.
Select the object using the Pick Tool.

2.
Position the pointer over either the top center or bottom center handle (Figure 42). Press the left mouse button and vertically drag the handle. As you drag, a wireframe representation of the resized object appears. Also, the mouse pointer will change to a double-headed vertical arrow. If you drag the handle toward the object, it will become shorter (Figure 43). If you drag the handle away from the object, it will become taller (Figure 44).

Figure 42. To change an object's height use either the top center or bottom center handle.


Figure 43. As you drag the handle toward the object, a wireframe version of the shorter object appears. The object itself remains stationary until the mouse is released.


Figure 44. As you drag the handle away from the object, a wireframe version of the taller object appears. The object itself stays stationary until you release the mouse button.


3.
Release the mouse button when the object is the desired height.

Tip

You can keep an eye on the object's new height by watching the vertical ruler bar at the left of the screen.


To proportionally change an object's width and height:

1.
Select the object with the Pick Tool.

2.
Press the left mouse button and diagonally drag any one of the corner handles (Figure 45). As you drag a wireframe representation of the resized image appears. In addition, the mouse pointer will change to a four-headed arrow shaped like an X. If you drag toward the object, it will become smaller (Figure 46). If you drag away from the object, it will become larger (Figure 47).

Figure 45. The handles at the corners of an object are used to proportionally resize the object's height and width.


Figure 46. As you drag a corner handle toward an object, it becomes proportionally smaller.


Figure 47. As you diagonally drag a corner handle away from an object, it becomes proportionally larger.


3.
Release the mouse button when you are happy with the object's new size.

More About Dragging Handles

1.
To scale an object from its center, hold down the Shift key while dragging a handle.

2.
Press the Ctrl key while dragging a handle to resize the object in 100 percent increments. The size of your object can be as big or small as you'd like. Just change the ruler scale to match what you need, for instance, miles, kilometers, pixels, or millimeters.


To delete an object:

1.
Select the object using the Pick Tool.

2.
Choose Delete from the Edit menu (Figure 48) or press the Delete key on the keyboard.

Figure 48. To delete an object, select it, and then choose Delete from the Edit menu.


Tip

If you press the Backspace key instead of the Delete key, nothing will happen.


The Tab Key and Selecting

When working with several objects that are close together or on top of each other, it can be difficult to click on the object you want to select.

You can use the keyboard to select the correct object by clicking on an object in your drawing with the Pick Tool, then successively pressing the Tab key until the correct object is selected. As you press the Tab key, watch the Status Bar. It will give you information about which object is currently selected.


Summary

In this chapter you learned how to:

  • Select and move an object

  • Select all objects on a page

  • Marquee select objects

  • Copy and duplicate objects

  • Clone objects

  • View two documents

  • Copy and move objects between documents

  • Resize objects horizontally and vertically

  • Proportionally resize an object

  • Delete an object


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