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Chapter 20. A Network Security Primer > Understanding Share Permissions

Understanding Share Permissions

Once users have gained access to the network, they will need to access network resources. An important aspect of sharing information on the network is keeping highly sensitive or proprietary data secure while it is shared. This means some users will have access to the information and some won’t. It also means that your users will have different levels of access to the data.

Note

Microsoft Windows networks running Windows 2000 Server or Windows Server 2003 also provide you with the ability to secure resources right down to the file level. This is because NTFS (NT File System) provides different access levels to files, folders, and drives. Because a folder on a Windows network can be both protected by share permissions (as we’ve discussed here) and NTFS permissions, figuring out the actual rights that a user has to a particular resource can become quite a brainteaser. For example, if a user is given full access to a folder due to the share permissions set on that folder, but is assigned an NTFS permission of no access, the user will not be able to access the folder. These two different permission systems combine so that the most restrictive access provided is realized by the user. For more detailed information regarding access permissions on a Windows network, check out Sams Teach Yourself Windows Server 2003 in 24 Hours.



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