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Chapter 4. Installing the Home Networkin... > Adding a Windows 2000 Professional C...

Adding a Windows 2000 Professional Computer to Your Home Network

Unfortunately, Windows 2000 computers can’t be connected to a home network as quickly or easily as Windows XP, Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, or Windows Me computers. The easiest way to connect a Windows 2000 computer to a home network is to upgrade the Windows 2000 computer to Windows XP, and then follow the instructions provided in this book for connecting a Windows XP computer to your network. However, this may not always be an option for you, especially if you plan to connect a computer that you don’t own, such as a laptop computer from work, to your network. With some patience, however, you can still connect a Windows 2000 computer to your Windows XP home network. Windows 2000 exhibits the following traits on a Windows XP network:

  • For non–Windows 2000 computers on the network to be able to see shared folders on the Windows 2000 computer, you will have to manually configure each non–Windows 2000 computer to access shared files and folders on the Windows 2000 computer. To do this, on each Windows computer, double-click the My Network Places or Network Neighborhood icon, and then click the Add Network Place icon.

  • To access shared folders and printers on your home network, you will have to manually configure the Windows 2000 computer. To add a shared folder, double-click the My Network Places icon on the Windows desktop, and then click the Add Network Place icon. To add a printer, on the Start menu, point to Settings, click Printers, and click the Add Printer icon to start the Add Printer Wizard.

  • To modify certain settings on a Windows 2000 computer, you will need to be able to log on with Administrator privileges. See the sidebar “Logging on as Administrator in Windows 2000” on the following page for more information.

In this exercise, you have brought home the Windows 2000 laptop that you use at work so that you can connect it to your home network. Because the laptop was already set up for the corporate network, you didn’t need to change its network settings. Both your home network and corporate network use Ethernet, so you connected the Windows 2000 computer to an Ethernet cable that’s plugged into the hub of the home network. Then you shared a folder on the Windows 2000 computer. To set up a Windows XP computer on your network so that it can gain access to the shared folder on the Windows 2000 computer, complete the following steps:

1.
On the Windows XP computer on your network, on the Start menu, click My Network Places.

2.
In the Network Tasks list, click Add A Network Place.

The Add A Network Place Wizard starts.

3.
Click Next.

The Where Do You Want To Create This Network Place? page appears.

4.
Click Choose Another Network Location, and then click Next.

The What Is The Address Of This Network Place? page appears.

5.
Type the location of the shared folder that you want to access. This should be in the format \\computer name\shared folder name (for example, \\Workcomputer\Shareddocs). Click Next.

The wizard locates the shared folder, and the What Do You Want To Name This Place? page appears.

6.
Type a name for the network place (for example, Shared docs on Work computer). Click Next.

The Completing The Add Network Place page appears.

7.
Click Finish to close the wizard.

The shortcut to the shared folder on the Windows 2000 computer is created. You can now double-click this shortcut to gain access to the shared folder:

Logging on as Administrator in Windows 2000

Unlike with Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows 98 Second Edition computers, you will need to log on to the Windows 2000 Professional computer using an account with Administrator privileges to add a printer, add a network place, or map a network drive. If you are using a Windows 2000 computer from work, you may or may not have these privileges, depending on the network security policy of your employer. If you are unsure whether you have Administrator privileges, ask your company’s network administrator.

All Windows 2000 computers have a built-in user account called Administrator that has Administrator privileges. If you know the password for the Administrator account, you can log on and change system settings, including adding a printer, adding a network place, or mapping a network drive. To log on to a Windows 2000 Professional computer with Administrator privileges:

1.
Turn on your Windows 2000 Professional computer.

2.
Press Ctrl+Alt+Delete to begin.

3.
In the User Name box, type Administrator.

4.
In the Password box, type the Administrator password for your computer.

5.
Click the down arrow to the right of the Log On To box, and in the drop-down list, click the name of the computer followed by (this computer).

6.
Click OK to log on.

The Log On To Windows dialog box appears.

Now you can use the Add Printer Wizard on your Windows 2000 Professional computer to access shared printers on your home network. You can also access shared folders on the computers on your home network by mapping drives or adding new network places.


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