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Chapter 11. HAVi > SOFTWARE ANATOMY

SOFTWARE ANATOMY

Home networking services in the HAVi architecture are modeled as objects. An object is a self-contained entity that consists of both data and procedures to manipulate this data. Each object has a unique name and identifier. HAVi objects are commonly called software elements because they are accessible to programmers through a well-defined interface. All objects make themselves known to other objects via a system-wide naming service known as a registry. The registry is a distributed database that stores information about the HAVi objects. Objects often use the registry to find other objects on the network. All objects communicate with each other using a message-passing model. The intercommunication between HAVi objects commences with the assignment of software element identifiers (SEIDs). All SEIDs are unique; however, they may change as a result of a reconfiguration of the devices on the network. Objects use this identification number in conjunction with a general-purpose messaging mechanism to request services from other objects. The messaging mechanism consists of a suite of network and transport layer protocols that provide HAVi software elements with communication facilities. The actual implementation of this messaging system differs from vendor to vendor; however, the format of these messages and the protocols used for their delivery remains common across all HAVi-based home networks. To improve our understanding of the HAVi software architecture, let's examine the software elements of a typical FAV device (see Figure 11.1).

Figure 11.1. HAVi software architecture



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