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Chapter 1. Introduction > Chapter Summaries

1.3. Chapter Summaries

This book is mainly organized into two parts: home transmission environment (Chapters 2 to 5) and corresponding wired/wireless protocols (Chapters 6 to 11). The last chapter (Chapter 12) is about home network topology and interconnection protocols. Each chapter in the first part of the book discusses a particular environment by walking through corresponding transmission medium characteristics, channel models, noise models, and channel capacities. Some MATLAB files for related calculations are also included. Cable physical dimensions are presented; then corresponding channel models are constructed based on two-port network analysis for wired environment. ISM band regulations are discussed and a few previously published channel models are represented for RF wireless environment. Each chapter in the second part covers standardized transmission protocols of a particular environment by examining highlights of related standards and corresponding transceiver structures followed by some performance estimations. Only highlights of standards are included for the introduction to the related transmission protocol. Full details can be more appreciated by subsequently studying related standards documents. Thanks to the IEEE contract to the industry initiative, Ethernet and Wireless Ethernet standards documents can be directly downloaded from IEEE Web site [2, 19]. Other standards documents can also be obtained by joining related standards groups [3, 7, 9, 10]. Transceiver structures are presented by referencing some standards conforming product implementations as well as Simulink modeling. Some MATLAB files are also included for related calculations. Updated MATLAB and Simulink files of this book are also posted at http://authors.phptr.com/chen/ and the Web site of The MathWorks, Inc..

Specifically, Chapter 2 studies channel models for twisted pair cables. While the dimension of the inner copper conductor is commonly measured by AWG (American Wire Gauge), the transmission quality of data-grade twisted pair cable is typically labeled as Categories 3 to 5 as specified by TIA/EIA (Telecommunications Industry Association/Electronic Industries Alliance) standards. Here, a larger category number means a better quality. On the other hand, the transmission quality of in-home telephone wiring, especially for data transmission application, is usually poor and not specified. Transmission characteristics of a twisted pair cable can be represented by frequency-dependent primary parameters of R, L, G, and C per unit length or a parametrized model. They can also be represented by a frequency-dependent transmission line model of Z and γ. While there is only a straight Category 3 or 5 cable between Ethernet transceivers, wiring branches occur on in-home telephone wirings. The ABCD matrix– based two-port network analysis is introduced for the construction of channel models involving cable sections and branches. Thermal, crosstalk, and RF ingress/egress noises are also discussed for the twisted pair cable environment. Channel capacities are then calculated in accordance with these channel and noise models under different constraints. MATLAB files for calculations of RLGC parameters, ABCD matrices, insertion loss, and channel capacity are attached.


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