• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 1. Introduction > Home Environment

1.1. Home Environment

Our daily living places have many commonalities. Rooms are usually separated by interior walls and interconnected by doors. Interior walls are normally made of sheetrock nailed to a wood frame from both sides and covered by paint. Electrical, telephony, cable TV, HVAC, and smoke detector wirings are typically laid within these hollow walls during the construction of a home building. Typical room dimensions range from 10 feet by 10 feet for bedrooms up to 20 feet by 20 feet for family-gathering living rooms. Room ceiling heights can range from 7 feet up to 11 feet. A single family home usually consists of one or two stories with a total living space of between 1500 and 4500 square feet. The floor separation is usually made of sheetrock for the downstairs ceiling and carpet laid over clapboard for upstairs floors. Exterior dimensions of a single family home are from 20 feet by 30 feet up to 40 feet by 60 feet. The exterior wall of a home building is usually covered by sidings of vinyl, wood, brick, or stucco. A single-family home is usually located on a private lot of from 1/8 to 1 acre. Children's play set, a swimming pool, or a garden are normally located in the backyard of a single-family home's private lot. The backyard is considered a part of the home living space especially during warm weather.

Existing in-home wirings, including electrical, telephony, and cable TV, are all the daisy-chain type and are connected to external service networks. From an entrance point, usually located on one side of a home at the first-floor or basement level, a few branches of wires are used to connect wall outlets or plugs at different rooms through the whole house. The length of each wire branch is related to the dimension of a house and is usually less than 100 feet. Electrical wiring usually comes to a house with a neutral wire and two hot wires of opposite phases. They are terminated at a distribution panel inside the house and connected to in-home electrical wiring through circuit breakers. A local ground wire is also introduced at the distribution panel. Each electrical wall outlet is connected to a hot wire, the neutral wire, and the ground wire for safety protection. Two phases of hot wires are used for heavy-duty home appliances such as a wall oven or a clothes dryer. Otherwise, they are randomly used throughout the whole house. In other words, electrical outlets on different walls of the same room can be of opposite phases. The telephone service network is connected to in-home telephone wiring at a demarcation box located outside a house. In-home telephone wiring can have two pairs, four pairs, or more. Some newer homes are wired with Category 5 data-grade cables in a home-run configuration, where every telephone outlet is individually connected to a central location, for telephone usage. An Ethernet can be installed over home-run in-home telephone wiring as a home network. The cable TV service is usually connected to in-home coaxial cables through a lightning protection block located outside the structure. Multiple wall plugs are all connected to the same entrance coaxial cable via splitters, which introduces 3 decibels (dB) of signal loss for every 1-to-2 split.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint