• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 4. Electrical Wiring > In-House Electrical Wiring Model

4.2. In-House Electrical Wiring Model

Electricity has found its applications in every household for about 100 years. To ensure the safe use of electricity, the first edition of the National Electrical Code (NEC) was published during 1897. Since then the NEC has been updated every two or three years to keep up with technological developments [2]. The National Fire Protection Association has acted as a sponsor for the NEC since the 1911 edition. NEC gives guidelines on methods, material, wiring, and protection for residential and other end-user applications. The essential part of the NEC has been voluntarily adopted by most states and municipalities. NEC has provided safety for electricity usage and uniformity in wiring practices.

4.2.1. Wiring Practice

An average residential unit is connected to the distribution transformer through a service drop as shown in Figure 4.10. A service drop usually has three conductors: two each for 120 V of opposite phases (for a combined 240 V) and one for a neutral. Starting from the service entrance, service cables go through a usage meter and are terminated at the service enclosure box. Feeder cables are then used to connect the service enclosure box and the feeder panel.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint