• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Acknowledgments

Acknowledgments

My initial involvement with Home Network is related to the development of Asymmetrical Digital Subscriber Lines (ADSL). The idea of ADSL was originated by Dr. Joe Lechleider of Bellcore around 1990 to provide video-on-demand services over existing telephone lines. For that particular application, we needed a home distribution system to reach multiple TV sets. We looked at Dave Goodman's analog TV signal transmission system over existing in-house telephone wiring [1]. John Cioffi's group at Stanford University and Kamren Sistanizdel of Bell Atlantic proposed a digital distribution system over existing in-house telephone wires [2]. J. J. Werner and his Bell Labs group made in-house telephone wiring measurements and examined related issues [3, 4]. Dave Waring encouraged many of us to work with different Home Network–related standards bodies, such as the 1394 trade association, when I was reporting to him at Bellcore. Don Shaver supported the establishment of a 1394-based home network test bed in addition to the long distance 1394 effort when I was working for Texas Instruments (TI) from 1995 to 1997. I enjoyed conversations with Ed Frank and Jason Trachewsky of Epigram while examining their in-house telephone wiring–based transmission technology on behalf of TI. Vedat Eyuboglu gave me the opportunity to be involved with HomePNA, HomePlug, and HomeRF technologies on behalf of Motorola when I was working there from 1997 to 1999. I have learned much about HomePlug from Brian Mark Walter of Intellon. My additional involvement with HomePlug was also supported by Stephan Taylor and Bulent Celebi of Scenix (now Ubicom). Paul Willes of Phonex Broadband taught me much about Walsh transform. Thanks to Rouben Gharagozian and Paviz Ghaffaripour, I have enjoyed working on home connectivity–related projects since I joined MAXIM Integrated Products. Many of the discussions in this book would not have been possible without the cumulative experience I gained during these years.

I also appreciate Bernard Goodwin of Prentice Hall Professional Technical Reference (PTR) for giving me the opportunity to publish this book and for his patience in allowing me the time to finish the writing. I appreciate, as well, Naomi Fernandes of MathWorks, Inc., for signing me up on its author's program and supplying me the MATLAB/Simulink programs. Many thanks go to my reviewers: Steve Hirschman, Brian Mark Walter, and Jayhan Karaoguz for their corrections, comments, and suggestions. Many thanks also go to Don MacLaren, Bill Hartman, and Sara Black of BooksCraft for their professional efforts in copyediting, proofreading, and creation of final pages. I also thank Michelle Vincenti, Anne Garcia, Lisa Iarkowski, and others at Prentice Hall PTR for coordination of the project and their other help. My appreciation is expressed to Claudio Stanziola and Jacqueline Hansson of IEEE for giving permission to discuss technical details and to use some figures from IEEE standards documentation. Thanks to Rich Nesin, Steve Strauss, Jed Johnson, as well as others on the board of directors of HomePNA for giving permission to discuss technical details and to use some figures from HomePNA technical specification documents. I thank Rob Ranck and Larry Yonge as well as members of the HomePlug technical committee for giving me guidelines for discussing the HomePlug technology. Thanks, too, to HomeRF Associates: I hope my discussion in this book is consistent with their goal of moving this technology to academic institutions for further exploration.

Finally, I thank my wife, Nancy, and my sons, Aaron and Brian, for their warm support in the writing of this book, as well as a few other ventures. I hope that this book will also make my parents, Frank and Sally, and my sister, Linda, proud.

Thanks, too, to IEEE and HomePNA for use of the following figures.

Figures 6.46.7, 6.136.15, 6.246.26, 6.30, 6.31, 6.33, 6.63, 6.64, 6.836.87, and 6.896.91 reprinted with permission from IEEE Std 802.3, 2000 Ed., "IEEE Standard for Information technology-telecommunications and information exchange between systems-Local and metropolitan area networks-Specific requirements Part 3: Carrier sense multiple access with collision detection (CSMA/CD) access method and physical layer specifications," Copyright 2000, by IEEE.

Figures 8.1, 8.2, 8.48.14, 8.21, and 8.22 reprinted with permission from IEEE Std 1394-1995, "Standard for a High Performance Serial Bus-FireWire," Copyright 1995, by IEEE. The IEEE disclaims any responsibility or liability resulting from the placement and use in the described manner.

Figures 8.24, 8.25, and 8.27 reprinted with permission from IEEE Std 1394B-2002, "Standard for a High Performance Serial Bus-Amendment 2," Copyright 2001, by IEEE.

Figures 10.1810.20 reprinted with permission from IEEE Std. 802.11, First Edition, "IEEE Standard for Information technology-Telecommunications and information exchange between systems-Local and metropolitan area networks-Specific requirements Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) specifications," Copyright 1999, by IEEE.

Figure 10.31 reprinted with permission from IEEE Std 802.11b-1999 (Supplement to IEEE Std 802.11, 1999 Edition), "Supplement to IEEE Standard for Information technology-Telecommunications and information exchange between systems-Local and metropolitan area networks-Specific requirements Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) specifications: Higher-Speed Physical Layer Extension in the 2.4 GHz Band," Copyright 2000, by IEEE.

Figures 10.5310.58 reprinted with permission from IEEE Std 802.11a-1999 (Supplement to IEEE Std 802.11-1999), "Supplement to IEEE Standard for Information technology-Telecommunications and information exchange between systems-Local and metropolitan area networks-Specific requirements Part 11: Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) specifications: Higher-Speed Physical Layer in the 5 GHz Band," Copyright 1999, by IEEE.

The IEEE disclaims any responsibility or liability resulting from the placement and use in the described manner of the figures cited above.

Figures 7.1, 7.4, 7.9, 7.10, 7.127.14, 7.16, 7.17, and 7.21 reprinted with permission from HomePNA Specifications,"Home Phoneline Networking Alliance 1M8 PHY Specification, Version 1.1, June 2, 1999" and "Interface Specification for HomePNA 2.06 10M8 Technology, March 20, 2000," Copyright 1998 and 1999, by Home-PNA. HomePNA disclaims any responsibility or liability resulting from the placement and use in the described manner.

  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint