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Chapter 5. GarageBand > Arrange and modify regions in your song

Arrange and modify regions in your song

A loop placed in a track is considered a region. You can make as many changes as you want to a region's position, duration, pitch, or sound effects without affecting the original loop. As you work on your song, “loop” refers to the original, unchanged audio clip, and “region” refers to the version of the audio clip that's in the Timeline, modified or not.

Ways to modify a region

  • To delete a region (loop) from a track, select it, then press Delete.

    Or select a region in a track, then press Command X.

    Or from the Edit menu, choose “Cut” or “Delete.”

  • To copy a region and place it somewhere else, select it, then press Command C, or from the Edit menu, choose “Copy.” Select a track into which you want to paste the copied region. Position the Playhead where you want the beginning of the region to be placed. Then press Command V, or from the Edit menu, choose “Paste.”

    Or Option-drag a region to a different position in the track or to another track. The original region stays in its position and a copy of the region is dragged to the new position.

  • Resize a region to change its duration.

    To lengthen a region's duration, place the pointer over the top half of the region's right edge. The pointer changes to a loop pointer. Drag the edge to the right to lengthen the region. A duplicate of the original region shows in the new lengthened area (shown below). This is known as looping. The region will loop (repeat) seamlessly and smoothly. You can drag the region edge out as far as you need to make the loop repeat as many times as necessary.

    To shorten a region's duration, place the pointer over the bottom half of the region's right edge. The pointer changes to a resize pointer. Drag the edge to the left to shorten the region.

  • Transpose a region to a different key, up or down, in semitone increments. There are 12 semitones in an octave.

    Regions created with Real Instrument loops (blue regions) can be transposed up or down a maximum of 12 semitones.

    Regions created with Software Instrument loops (green regions) can be transposed up or down 36 semitones, or three octaves.

    Regions created from Real Instrument recordings (purple regions) cannot be transposed.


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