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Chapter 4. Maple Mike: > Hey! Let's Build the Trigger! - Pg. 127

MAKE: PROJECTS Eccentric Cubicle can lay your hands on a length of suitably dimensioned and threaded tempered steel rod to use as an axle, by all means do so: I've tried my damnedest to minimize the effect of off- axis strain on the assembly by providing extra support every- where possible, but the axle is the weak point of the mecha- nism, and prone to bending under high tension. "Strong Like Bull" is a damned good way to approach the axle. Pictured is the component chain both exploded and assem- bled; one bearing race goes on each side of the chassis, and the club holder assembly threads onto the righthand side, between the shoulder washer and the nut. The photograph shows acorn nuts and steel washers; the finished piece uses brass washers, an additional decorative brass disc, and . . . threaded brass balls as nuts. [Figure 04.19, Figure 04.20] Install the bearing system in the chassis, and mount the clubholder assembly. It should spin effortlessly with no wobble. If it doesn't, check the chassis axle passage and bearing mounting cavities for binding. A bit of sandpaper action should set things right. Leave the chassis/clubholder assembled for the moment to allow test-fitting of the remaining subassemblies as they're fabricated. Speaking of which . . . Hey! Let's Build the Trigger! The trigger latch mechanism uses a cammed lever to retract the springloaded rod that does the actual latching. It only looks hard to fabricate. [Figure 04.21, Figure 04.22] The cam lever is cut and drilled from brass plate. The design allows for a smooth 1 / 2 " of shaft travel over a bit more than 90 degrees of actual rotation, terminating in a solid position lock at full open. The curve is based on a 1" diameter circle, but feel free to get artsy with the arc to achieve the performance you want. The reason we're building the damned thing is so that you have an incentive Figure 04.18: Behold the evocatively antiquey might of the decorative ogee! Figure 04.19: The axle assembly revealed: all the needful bits laid out . . . Figure 04.20: . . . and fully assembled. Friction doesn't stand a chance. 116