• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 11. The Upgrade Path

Chapter 11. The Upgrade Path

Even the most well-planned system eventually needs to be updated. This chapter is dedicated to helping you recognize which components will stay with you for years and which will likely be the first to need replaced. A quality set of loudspeakers, for example, will likely withstand the test of time much better than a home theater receiver (not because the receiver is inferior but because receiver technology changes much faster than speaker technology). By building a system properly and thinking about eventual upgrades upfront, you can minimize future costs. I also introduce you to the world of separates, which are found in virtually every high-end audio system. If your system has been built properly, the jump from a home theater receiver to separates should be simple and rewarding.

The first thing home theater owners want to upgrade is their sound system; they want to upgrade to obtain the most current, best sound available. If you’ve done your homework, making an audio upgrade should be simple, but if you haven’t and own a poorly compiled system, you may not only have trouble upgrading, but it could also be very costly. That’s the problem with the “home theater in a box”; it’s less expensive in the short term but a burden in the long term, because it is often difficult, if not impossible, to upgrade only a single component in the system. You have to buy a completely new system or settle for what you already own.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint