• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 24. Fixing Photo Flaws > Repairing Black-and-White Pictures

Repairing Black-and-White Pictures

Why is it that the pictures you care about most are the ones that inevitably fade, get wrinkled, get chewed up by the dog, or fall prey to so many other disasters? It probably has some relation to Murphy's Law—whatever can go wrong, will.

The good news, though, is that you're not totally stuck when your kid smears peanut butter on the only decent picture of Great-Grandma, or the cat thinks your parents wedding photo is a new cat toy. First, as soon as you discover the damage, wipe off any residual cat slobber or other foreign substances, if you can do it without damaging the photo any more. The second thing is to scan it into your computer.

Depending on the size of the photo, scan it same size. If it's a tiny snapshot, size it larger—you might as well be able to see what you're doing. 300 dpi is plenty for most uses, especially if it's an old photo. The film grain will be about that size, too.


Some pictures need a little help; others need a lot. Let's start with things that can be easily fixed. The little girl shown in Figure 24.34 is badly exposed, and it appears as if this picture, and two others that were sent with it and shot the same day, were taken with a camera that leaked light. That explains the dark streak in the same place on all three. Still, there's a lot of hope for this one. It just needs some contrast.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint