• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Introduction > ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS

ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS

Harry McCracken has been swatting PC irritations (or trying to) since 1978, when he learned that the Radio Shack TRS-80's keyboard had a tendency to repeaat chharacterss at ranndom. After discovering that other computers-such as the Atari 400, Apple Macintosh Plus, and Commodore Amiga-were equally aggravating in other ways, he eventually turned to Microsoft Windows-the Mother of All Annoying PC Platforms-and found work in the computer-magazine industry, where they actually pay you to complain about PCs. Currently the editor in chief of PC World, the largest monthly computer magazine, Harry has written for InfoWorld, Family Circle, USA Today, and other publications, and has been a guest on "Dateline NBC," NPR's "Marketplace," and many other television and radio programs. He lives in San Francisco's up-and-coming Mervyn Heights neighborhood and wears fashionable eyeglasses.

Dan Tynan is an award-winning journalist, TV commentator, and high-tech guru and has been described as "witty," "smart," and "not as big a geek as you might think" (primarily by his wife). In 16 years of journalism, Dan has won more than 20 national awards and has been published in 13 languages.

Dan began his editorial career in 1986, as a lowly copyeditor at InfoWorld magazine. The next year he jumped to PC World, where he began a meteoric rise up the editorial food chain. This culminated in 1995 with his appointment as Editor in Chief at CD-ROM Today magazine; he later served as Executive Editor for Features at PC World for nearly four years. By the time you read this, Dan's first book, Computer Privacy Annoyances (O'Reilly), should be heading to the printer.

Most recently, Dan's CNET column, "Inside @ccess," has won two Maggie Awards (in 2002 and 2003) for Best Online Column (each time beating out Steve Bass, who amazingly agreed to let him contribute to this book anyway).

David Jung has co-authored an array of books and articles on programming and debugging Visual Basic, Microsoft Outlook, Java, and other Internet solutions. He is a frequent speaker at seminars and user groups, discussing how technology can be integrated into business solutions. In his spare time (usually after 2:00 a.m.), he writes terrifically useful Windows utility programs that help track down and eliminate system crashes, as well as prevent script-based viruses from spreading on Windows-based computers. Two of his programs, DLL Checker and VBS Defender, received PC World's Editor's Choice award and continue to be sold to users all over the world. (David's web site can be found at http://vb2java.com.)

Carl Siechert has been trying (with mixed success) to make sense of personal computers for over 20 years. During that time his firm, Siechert & Wood Professional Documentation, has written manuals, online help, and other documentation for numerous hardware and software products (only the good manuals-not the ones you swear at). In addition, Carl has written a dozen books about Windows and MS-DOS. One recent book, Microsoft Windows Security Inside Out for Windows XP and Windows 2000, won an award of merit from the Society for Technical Communication.

When the computing annoyances become too great, Carl goes hiking, returning whenever possible to the Pacific Crest Trail. He recently made a small concession to his no-electronics-in-the-wilderness vow by carrying a small LED flashlight.

Preston Gralla has been annoyed by the PC-and especially digital media (see his contributions to Chapter 6)-since he was knee high to a disk drive. The proud owner of seven computers, Preston is the author of more than 30 books about computing, including Internet Annoyances, Windows XP Hacks, and Windows XP Power Hound (all from O'Reilly). His lengthy experience in computer journalism includes stints at PC Week, PC/Computing (which he founded and where he was editorial director), and working as an executive editor at both ZDNet and CNET. Preston has won a number of awards, including Best Feature in a Computer Publication from the Computer Press Association.

  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint