• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

Controls

The iPod has rightly been praised for its ease of use. As with all its products, Apple strove to make the iPod as intuitive as possible, placing a limited number of controls and ports on the device. When Apple designed the business card–sized iPod mini, it had to be even more careful about the placement of its controls than with the original iPod. With such a limited set of controls, of course, some controls have to perform more than one function. In the following pages, I examine just what the controls and ports on the original iPod and iPod mini do.

On the Face of It

On the front of your iPod (Figure 1.7), you'll find a display and set of navigation controls. On the first two generations of iPods, these controls are arrayed around a central scroll wheel and are mechanical—meaning that they move and activate switches underneath the buttons. On the third-generation iPods, these controls are above the scroll wheel and are touch-sensitive; they activate when they come into contact with your flesh but, allegedly, not when a nonfleshy object (such as the case) touches them.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint