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Chapter 18. Fonts > Building Your Typeface Library (EF) - Pg. 627

Fonts 627 Stone Type Foundry (415/704-3253). Sumner Stone was once the director of typography at Adobe but followed his muse to his own design studio, where he has created some fine typeface families, including ITC Stone and Silica. T-26 (www.t26font.com). Some of these fonts are short on legibility--they might be made up of dots or squares or minimalist lines--but all are long on inventiveness and attitude. (Favorite font names: Quagmire, Kennel District, Who's Frank, Bad Angel.) Three Islands Press (www.typequarry.com). This small foundry offers some excellent handwriting fonts as well as a label-gun­style font. (Favorite font names: Treefrog, Speed Bump, Horsefeathers.) Tiro Typeworks (www.tiro.com). Designed with the professional typographer in mind, Tiro offers some serious faces, such as Aeneas, inspired by modern interpretations of classical Roman capi- tals, and Plantagenet, celebrating the English vernacular style. Treacyfaces/Headliners (www.treacyfaces.com). Joe Treacy's font collection comprises 400 care- fully crafted fonts, some of which have 5000 kerning pairs. In these days of sometimes slapdash fonts, it's good to see someone taking the time to do it right. TypeArt Foundry (www.typeart.com). Lively decorative, display, and specialty faces, and the best label-gunstyle font ever. (Favorite font names: Amnesia, Bighead, Typochondriac, Deviant Plain.) Vintage Type Font Foundry (www.vintagetype.com). Pining for your old Underwood typewriter? Pine no more; these folks offer lots of vintage typewriter fonts. Also some novelty and scruffy faces. (Favorite font names: Lucifer's Pension, Necrotic Fluid.) Will-Harris House (www.will-harris.com). In addition to several of font maven Daniel Will-Harris's own designs, his Web site includes Esperfonto, a step-by-step guide to choosing the right typeface for a particular job as well as additional design and typography tips. The site also includes a link to