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Chapter 1. Introduction > Technologies

1.7. Technologies

1.7.1. Forms of Interactivity

The technologies that render the TV interactive enable both local and remote interactivity. Whereas remote interactivity relies on an Internet Service Provider (ISP) to produce responses to viewer's commands, local interactivity relies on the receiver to respond without reaching to the Internet. Local interactivity implies downloading and executing interactive content locally, by the receiver, and enables customizing a single uniform broadcast to the individual preferences of millions of viewers. Remote interactivity implies converting viewers' commands into messages sent over the Internet, or other return channel technologies (e.g., the Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK) return channel used by Cable providers) and subsequently transforming responses received (e.g., HTML pages) for display.

1.7.2. Content Transport Technologies

This book surveys and presents two types of content transport technologies: MPEG-based and IP-based. MPEG-based transport techniques are best suited for over-the-air broadcasts, as well as for noisy cable transmissions. IP-based technologies are best suited for controlled transmission environments such as electromagnetically sheltered cables.


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