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Chapter 23. E-Mail: Postage Free, Same D... > Ugh! Setting Up Your E-Mail Program - Pg. 214

E-Mail: Postage Free, Same Day Delivery 214 Ugh! Setting Up Your E-Mail Program The hardest part about e-mail is getting your e-mail program to connect to your Internet service provider's e-mail server, which acts as an electronic post office. If you are using one of the major commercial online services, such as America Online or Microsoft Network, you can relax; the in- stallation program took care of all the details for you. You simply click the e-mail button and start using it. However, if you have a local service provider and are using a dedicated e-mail program, such as Microsoft's Outlook Express, first you must enter information telling your e-mail program how to connect to the mail server. Make sure you have the following information from your service provider: · E-mail address--Your e-mail address usually is all lowercase and starts with your first initial and last name (for example, jsmith@iway.com). However, if your name is John Smith (or Jill Smith), you might have to use something more unique, such as JohnHubertSmith@iway.com. · Outgoing mail (SMTP)--Short for Simple Mail Transfer Protocol, the SMTP server is the mailbox into which you drop your outgoing messages. It's actually your Internet service provider's com- puter. The address usually starts with mail or smtp (for example, mail.iway.com or smtp.iway.com). · Incoming mail (POP3)--Short for Post Office Protocol 3, the POP server is like your neighbor- hood post office. It receives incoming messages and places them in your personal mailbox. The address usually starts with pop (for example, pop.iway.com). · Account--This one is tricky; it could be your username--the name you use to log into your service provider (for example, jsmith)--or something entirely different, depending on your serv- ice provider. · Password--Typically, you use the same password for logging on and for checking e-mail. I can't