• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Lesson 4. Jewelcase booklet > Assembling the booklet cover

Assembling the booklet cover

After hiding the display of the master-page elements on the first page (booklet cover), you will create two layers to separate the art and text. You'll then divide the page into quadrants, place four photographs, and create the boxed title and subtitle.

Time out for a movie

Play the movie called 1Layers.mov. This movie introduces layers and, through a practical example, shows how layers can really make working in PageMaker easier. For information on playing the movie, see "PageMaker tutorial mlovies" in the Introduction to this book.

Looking at layers in the final version

Before you create layers in this booklet, take a look at how layers were used in the final version.

  1. Choose Window > 04Final.p65 to switch to the final version of the publication. (In Windows, the path to the file is displayed with the file name on the Window menu.)

  2. If necessary, click the page 1 icon to view the front cover of the booklet.

  3. Choose Window > Show Layers.


    Figure 4.12.


    Layers let you separate like elements and treat them like a unit without grouping them. When elements are on a layer, you can display them, hide them, lock them, or even change their stacking order in relation to the rest of the publication. You'll use layers in this booklet to speed up screen redraw and make layout easier. After placing the photographic images on the Art layer, you'll hide that layer as you work on the text layer. When you want to display both layers, you can quickly lock one layer so you don't have to worry about inadvertently moving an object.

  4. Click the eye icon ( ) of the Art layer.

    PageMaker hides the Art layer throughout the publication, not just on the displayed page. A hidden layer also does not print.

  5. Click the page 2 icon, and then click to display the eye icon of the Art layer to again view the images.

    You can determine which layer an element is on by selecting the element.

  6. Select the image behind the table of contents on page 2.


    Figure 4.13.


    The layer containing the selected element becomes the target layer. (It is highlighted and contains the pencil icon.) The small selection box next to the pencil icon indicates that something on that layer is selected. Notice that the color of the graphic handles of the selected image match the color swatch of the layer.

    The three palettes you'll use most often in creating this booklet are the Layers, Styles, and Colors palettes. You can combine the three to leave more room to view your page.

  7. Drag the Layers tab to the Colors and Styles palette, and then click the Close box of the Master Pages palette.


    Figure 4.14.


Creating layers

You are now ready to create two new layersin your booklet.

  1. Choose File > Close to close 04Final.p65 and to return to your publication. If prompted to save before closing, click No.

    Your publication already contains a default layer (called Default). Because that was the only layer when you created the master pages, all the master page elements automatically were placed on the Default layer. You can place master page elements on any layer, and with the exception of stacking order, they will behave like any other element on the layer. However, master page elements always display at the bottom of the stacking order, regardless of the layer they are on.

    You will leave the Master Page elements on the Default layer.

  2. Click the New Layer button ( ) at the bottom of the Layers palette, type Text for Name, and click OK.

    Create the next layer using the Layers palette menu.

  3. Choose New Layer from the Layers palette menu, type Art for Name, and click OK.

    The stacking order of layers reflects their order in the palette: the bottom layer in the palette is the bottom layer in the publication. Since the text in the booklet appears on top of the images, you want the text layer to be the top layer. Changing the order of layers is simple.

  4. In the Layers palette, drag the Art layer down between the Text and Default layer. As you drag, insertion triangles appear on the edges of the layers to show you where the layer will be inserted.


    Figure 4.15.


Hiding the display of master-page elements

You can display master-page elements on a page-by-page basis. Because the design doesn't use master-page elements on the cover, you will deselect the display of the master-page elements for the cover.

  1. Click the page 1 icon to view the front cover of the booklet.

    Since master-page elements are automatically displayed on each page of the publication, the first page of the publication is displayed with all master-page elements found on the right master page.

    You can easily hide master-page elements on a page.

  2. Choose View > Display Master Items to deselect the option.

The text and graphic elements that you created are not displayed, but the nonprinting guides (margin, column, and ruler) are not affected. If you were to print this page, none of the master-page elements would be printed.

Placing and cropping a graphic

After dividing the front cover into quadrants, you will place a photograph into each quadrant. The photographs were prepared in Adobe Photoshop by applying a single color to a grayscale TIFF image, and then sizing and saving each image in TIFF file format at a resolution of 100 dpi.

  1. From the horizontal ruler, drag to create a horizontal ruler guide at 14p3. From the vertical ruler, drag to create a vertical ruler guide at 14p2, dividing the booklet cover into quadrants.

    As you learned in Lesson 1, you can move the zero point (the intersection of the horizontal and vertical rulers) to any location on the page. To make it a little easier to align the four photographs on the cover, you will move the zero point from the top-left corner of the page until it is aligned with the center of the page. Each image will have a corner touching the zero point, making it easy to enter their precise location in the Control palette.

  2. With the pointer tool selected, position the pointer on the crosshair of the zero point, and drag it until the zero point is aligned with the intersection of the ruler guides you just created. Watch the position in the Control palette; X should be 14p2, and Y should be 14p3.


    Figure 4.16.


  3. Make sure the Art layer is still the target layer. If not, click to select it.

  4. Choose File > Place, and double-click the 04ArtA.tif file in the 04Project folder.

  5. With the loaded graphic icon displayed, click in the upper left quadrant of the page to place the photograph.

    Since the photographs extend to the edges of the page, each photograph was sized to allow for a bleed to overlap the edges of the page. For the sake of viewing the actual design of the cover, you will crop each photograph to be aligned with the edges of the page. When the booklet is complete, one of the prepress tasks will be to pull the crop rectangles out again, to reestablish the bleeds.

    Before you crop, you'll position the images.

  6. In the Control palette, select the bottom right reference point in the Proxy icon, type 0 for both X and Y, and press Enter or Return to align the bottom right corner of the photograph with the zero point.

    Precision will be important when cropping these images for two reasons. You will copy all the images on the cover and paste them onto the back cover. If cropped precisely to fit the page, they will be easier to position on the back cover. In addition, in the final printing of this booklet, the binding edges of the pages will abut each other, rather than bleed. If not cropped carefully, an image could overlap the adjacent page in the signature or not print all the way to the page fold. This is another example of the importance of talking to your service provider before you begin layout.

  7. Select the cropping tool ( ), and position the tool over the top left graphic handle of the photograph, making sure the graphic handle shows through the center of the cropping tool. Hold down the mouse button until the tool changes to a double-headed arrow.

  8. With the mouse button still held down, drag down and right to the top left corner of the page, and release the mouse button when W in the Control palette is 14p2, and H is 14p3.

    PageMaker crops the view of the photograph.


    Figure 4.17.


Placing and cropping the three remaining graphics

As you place the three remaining photographs on the cover, crop each one to be aligned with the edges of the page.

  1. Choose File > Place, and double-click the 04ArtB.tif file in the 04Project folder.

  2. With the loaded graphic icon displayed, click in the upper right quadrant of the page to place the photograph.

  3. In the Control palette, select the bottom left reference point in the Proxy icon, type 0 for both X and Y, and press Enter or Return.

  4. Select the cropping tool ( ), and position the tool over the top right graphic handle of the photograph, and drag down and left to the top right corner of the page. Watch the values in the Control palette; W should be 14p2, and H should be 14p3.


    Figure 4.18.


  5. Choose File > Place, and double-click the 04ArtC.tif file in the 04Project folder.

  6. With the loaded graphic icon displayed, click in the lower left quadrant of the page to place the photograph.

  7. In the Control palette, select the top right reference point in the Proxy icon, type 0 for both X and Y, and press Enter or Return.

    You will use the cropping tool in the Control palette to crop the next two images.

  8. Click the Cropping button ( ) in the Control palette. With the top right reference point still selected, type 14p2 for W, and 14p3 for H, and click the Apply button ( ).

  9. Choose File > Place, and double-click the 04ArtD.tif file in the 04Project folder.

  10. Position the loaded graphic icon in the lower right quadrant of the page and let it snap to the zero point. Then click to place the photograph.

  11. In the Control palette, select the top left reference point in the Proxy icon, type 0 for both X and Y. Click the Cropping button, and type 14p2 for W, and 14p3 for H. Then click the Apply button.


    Figure 4.19.


  12. Choose File > Save.

Creating a bordered frame for the title

Next to the rectangle, ellipse, and polygon tools in the toolbox, is a corresponding frame tool. Like standard PageMaker-drawn shapes, frames can have a stroke and fill. Unlike standard shapes, however, frames can also have content, either text or graphics. Frames make it easy for you to position objects and text within another shape and can serve as placeholders in templates or during the design phase of a publication.

You will create the title for this booklet in a bordered frame on the text layer.

  1. In the Layers palette, select the Text layer. Then click the eye icon ( ) of the Art layer to temporarily hide the images.

  2. Select the rectangle frame tool ( ), and drag to draw a box of any dimension in the center of the page.

  3. In the Control palette, select the center reference point in the Proxy icon. Type 0 for both X and Y (to center the frame on the page), type 9p7 for both W and H (to resize the frame), and press Enter or Return.

  4. Click the Colors palette tab, make sure the Both button ( ) is highlighted. Then select [Black] to apply the color black to the stroke and fill of the box.

  5. Choose Element > Stroke > 6-pt triple line to create a triple-line border.

    You now need to set the frame options. The frame options control the position of the content within the frame. You can center a text block vertically within a frame, or align its top or bottom with the top or bottom of the frame. You can also specify insets to offset text from the edges of the frame.

  6. With the frame still selected, choose Element > Frame > Frame Options. Choose Center for Vertical Alignment, set the Top, Bottom, Left, and Right Insets to 0, and click OK.

  7. Note

    Vertical Alignment and Offsets are the only frame options that affect text. The other options apply to graphics in a frame.



  8. Figure 4.20.


  9. Choose File > Save.

Time out for a movie

To learn more about frames, play the movie called 2Frames.mov. This movie shows you how to use frames as placeholders for text and graphics when designing a publication, and how those frame subsequently speed up layout. For information on playing the movie, see "PageMaker tutorial movies" in the Introduction to this book.

Defining process colors

This booklet calls for two custom colors. Before you define these process colors, you'll remove any unused colors from the palette.

  1. Choose Utilities > Define Colors, and click the Remove Unused button. When prompted, click Yes to All to remove all unused colors, then click OK when PageMaker lists the number of colors and inks removed. (Do not close the Define Colors dialog box.)

  2. In the Define Colors dialog box, click New. Type Sand for Name, and choose Process for Type and CMYK for Model. Then enter the CMYK values shown below. (You can press the Tab key to jump from one edit box to the next. (In Windows, press Tab twice.) After entering the Black value, press Tab again if you want to see the final color displayed in the color swatch.


    Figure 4.21.


  3. Click OK, and then click New again.

  4. Type Dark Blue for Name, and enter the CMYK values shown below.


    Figure 4.22.


  5. Hold down either Shift (Windows) or Option (Macintosh) and click OK to close the dialog boxes.

  6. Click the Maximize button in the top of the Colors palette to display the entire palette. (Click again if PageMaker minimizes the palette.)

    PageMaker added the new colors Dark Blue and Sand to the palette.


    Figure 4.23.


  7. Choose File > Save.

Creating the title

After creating the title, you will center it in the bordered box.

  1. Select the text tool ( ), and click inside the bordered frame to establish an insertion point. In the Character view of the Control palette, choose Birch for Font, type 24 for Size ( ), and click the Apply button ( ).

  2. In the Colors palette, select Sand to set the color for the text you are about to type.

  3. Type the following text, breaking the lines as shown with Enter or Return:

    Architectural

    Treasures

    of Italy

  4. Choose Edit > Select All. In the Control palette, type .05 for Kerning ( )Click the Paragraph-view button ( ), and then click the Center-align button ( ) to center the text horizontally in the frame.

    The text is now nicely centered horizontally in the frame, but vertically it is still a bit off-center. The frame option centers the entire block of text, including leading and Paragraph Space After settings. You can either calculate a top offset to push the text down or change the leading method, which changes where the text sits in the leading slug. Of the three leading methods, the Top of Caps leading option provides the best spacing for centering text vertically in a frame.

  5. With the text still selected, choose Type > Paragraph. Click Spacing, and select Top of Caps for Leading Method. Hold down Shift (Windows) or Option (Macintosh), and click OK to close the dialog boxes.


    Figure 4.24.


  6. Choose File > Save.

Placing the subtitle in a frame

After creating another frame, you will place the subtitle within it.

  1. Select the rectangle frame tool ( ), and drag to draw a box of any dimension below the existing black frame.

  2. In the Control palette, make sure the center reference point in the Proxy icon is selected. Type 0 for X, 11p8 for Y, 23p8 for W, and 1p4 for H, and press Enter or Return to resize the box and center it horrizontally on the page.

  3. In the Colors palette, click the Stroke button ( ). Make sure [Black] is selected.

  4. With the frame still selected, choose Element > Frame > Frame Options. Choose Center for Vertical Alignment, and set the Top, Bottom, Left, and Right Insets to 0. Then click OK.


    Figure 4.25.


  5. With the frame still selected, choose File > Place. Double-click 04TextA.doc in the 04Project folder.


    Figure 4.26.


    The subtitle appears in the frame.

  6. Select the text tool ( ), triple-click the subtitle to select it, and choose Type > Paragraph.

  7. Choose Center for Alignment. Click Spacing, and then select Top of Caps for Leading Method. Hold down Shift (Windows) or Option (Macintosh), and click OK to close the dialog boxes.

  8. In the Control palette, click the Character-view button ( ), and type 10 for Size ( ), 10 for Leading ( ), and .06 for Kerning ( ). Click the Bold ( ) and Italic ( ) buttons.

    To better set off the subtitle, you will change the frame to a solid black box and apply the paper color to the text. (As mentioned in the beginning of this lesson, clicking the Reverse button in the Control palette is the same as selecting the color [Paper] for text.)

  9. With the text still selected, select [Paper] in the Colors palette to apply the paper color to the subtitle. (The text disappears until you change the frame to black.)

  10. Select the pointer tool, select the subtitle frame, click the Fill button ( ) in the Colors palette, and select [Black].

  11. Click the Layers palette tab, click to display the eye icon ( ) of the Art layer to redisplay the photographic images.


    Figure 4.27.


    The front cover is completely assembled.

  12. Choose File > Save.

  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint