• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 30. Office XP with FrontPage: Wh... > Office XP As Web Authoring Suite

Office XP As Web Authoring Suite

The first point to make is also the most important one. In the past, FrontPage was Microsoft's essential authoring tool for Web documents. Indeed, it still is an essential authoring tool. But beginning with Office 2000, Microsoft began to put more emphasis on using the other Office applications to author Web documents. This has been no secret with Microsoft Word, but it has been a little harder to determine how exactly the other applications have fit into the mix, apart from the capability to import or otherwise incorporate such elements as spreadsheet data and database information.

With Office XP, however, there is no longer any doubt that Microsoft intends for the entire suite to serve as a large, complex, and full-featured Web authoring environment. Each application lets you save files in HTML format, and in the case of two applications—Access 2002 and Excel 2002—you can save data in XML, the markup language that has captured so much professional attention in the serving of data on Web sites. In other words, the idea of importing Office documents into a FrontPage web has been replaced by the capability to save Office documents directly to Web sites in the far less proprietary XHTML (HTML 4.0) formats. Furthermore, Office XP compatibility with HTML standards is stronger than at any time in the history of Microsoft Office, to the degree that you can feel quite certain that your Web pages will work with all recent Web browsers. Of course, part of this compatibility has to do with the fact that Microsoft's Internet Explorer is by far the most-used browser on the Internet now, so if the code is incompatible, it's less likely that anybody will actually notice. However, Office XP offers at least a reasonable degree of reassurance that Microsoft seems to have abandoned its earlier strategies of tailoring HTML, XML, and other Internet technologies for its own purposes, rather than sticking with the standards. This can only be good news.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint