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A Word About Planning

Although a book file allows you to manage all the files included in a book from a single window, you should still keep those files organized on your hard drive. For example, if you have a book file, 10 document files, and 1 table of contents, keeping all those files (and any referenced files, such as figures) in one folder on your computer disk helps you to manage those components. This is especially true if you plan to move the files to another location at a later time, whether it be to a CD, network server, or some other location on your local computer. Imagine if you had 10 document files in 10 different folders on your hard drive and referenced figure files in yet another location. If you were to move the files, it wouldn’t be easy to gather all the files from various locations and maintain the correct file path for the book file to locate each file. By keeping all the ingredients of your book in one location, the file path isn’t broken, and moving one folder to another location ensures that the path to each file contained in the book remains intact.

Another consideration is the file-naming conventions that you need to use for document files. For example, suppose that you created FrameMaker files with long filenames and included those in a book file. Next, you moved the book file and its components to another computer that’s not configured to read filenames with so many characters. The result: Each filename becomes truncated on the disk, and the book loses its connection to each file because the filenames no longer match the filename in the book file list.


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