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Placing Content

As we discussed extensively in Part I, “The Creative Suite 2,” InDesign is built to incorporate content from multiple sources into a single layout. Overall, you'll be placing two main categories of content into your layouts: text and graphics. Let's explore how this works.

To Frame or Not to Frame?

All content on an InDesign page must reside within a frame, which is a container for the content. Think of this frame as a plate for your food. You don't place food directly on your table (which would be rather messy); you first put a plate (the container) on your table and then place your food on the plate. Whether your “food” is a block of text or some kind of graphic, it must reside within a frame. InDesign has basically three types of frames: one that holds text, one that holds graphics, and one that is unassigned (see Figure 8.10). This last type is actually just a regular vector shape. In fact, try not to even focus too much on what kind of frame something is because all that InDesign cares about is that you have some kind of frame, which, under the hood, is simply a vector object. Any shape can be a frame for content. You can copy and paste a shape from Illustrator, and it can be a frame in an InDesign layout.


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