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Chapter 3. Text and Tables

Chapter 3. Text and Tables

Drop shadows? Who Cares. Button states? Big deal. Old school publication designers and production artists — the ones who remember waxers and press-on type — know that the make-or-break feature of any page layout program is how it handles type. Importing, threading, formatting, and tweaking a document's text usually account for the lion's share of layout work. If the program's default way of handling type-related tasks constantly works against you, creating professionally-typeset stories with it is a frustrating journey down a long and weary road.

Thus, InDesign arrives on the pro's desktop as welcome as a tall glass of cold spring water after a long walk 'cross a West-Texas county. Due to the quiet elegance of InDesign's Paragraph Composer and the common-sense justification default settings, type in InDesign simply looks better right from the start. Add to that the power and flexibility of its Open Type support (that cool Glyphs palette!); ingenious time-savers like nested styles and the Story Editor; and the incredibly rich table formatting options (struggles with tabular columns of text fade into distant memory); and you've got yourself a mighty text machine there, my friend.


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